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Article: Protection from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric ulcers by dietary nitrate

TitleProtection from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric ulcers by dietary nitrate
Authors
Issue Date2007
Citation
Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 2007, v. 42 n. 4, p. 510-518 How to Cite?
AbstractNitrate is abundant in our diet with particularly high levels in many vegetables. Ingested nitrate is concentrated in saliva and reduced to nitrite by bacteria in the oral cavity. We recently reported that application of nitrite-containing saliva to the gastric mucosa increases superficial blood flow and mucus generation via acid-catalyzed formation of bioactive nitrogen oxides including nitric oxide. Here we studied if dietary supplementation with nitrate would protect against gastric damage caused by a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Rats received sodium nitrate in the drinking water for 1 week in daily doses of 0.1 or 1 mmol kg- 1. Control rats received 1 mmol kg- 1 sodium chloride. Diclofenac (30 mg kg- 1) was then given orally and the animals were examined 4 h later. In separate experiments we studied the effects of dietary nitrate on intragastric NO levels and mucus formation. Luminal levels of NO gas were greatly increased in nitrate-fed animals. The thickness of the mucus layer increased after nitrate supplementation and gene expression of MUC6 was upregulated in the gastric mucosa. Nitrate pretreatment dose dependently and potently reduced diclofenac-induced gastric lesions. Inflammatory activity was reduced in the rats receiving nitrate as indicated by lower mucosal myeloperoxidase activity and expression of inducible NO synthase. We conclude that dietary nitrate protects against diclofenac-induced gastric ulcers likely via enhanced nitrite-dependent intragastric NO formation and concomitant stimulation of mucus formation. Future studies will reveal if a diet rich in nitrate can offer an additional nutritional approach to preventing and treating peptic ulcer disease. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192696
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.784
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.468
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJansson, EÅen_US
dc.contributor.authorPetersson, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorReinders, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorSobko, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorBjörne, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhillipson, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWeitzberg, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorHolm, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorLundberg, JOen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T04:56:05Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-20T04:56:05Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationFree Radical Biology and Medicine, 2007, v. 42 n. 4, p. 510-518en_US
dc.identifier.issn0891-5849en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192696-
dc.description.abstractNitrate is abundant in our diet with particularly high levels in many vegetables. Ingested nitrate is concentrated in saliva and reduced to nitrite by bacteria in the oral cavity. We recently reported that application of nitrite-containing saliva to the gastric mucosa increases superficial blood flow and mucus generation via acid-catalyzed formation of bioactive nitrogen oxides including nitric oxide. Here we studied if dietary supplementation with nitrate would protect against gastric damage caused by a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Rats received sodium nitrate in the drinking water for 1 week in daily doses of 0.1 or 1 mmol kg- 1. Control rats received 1 mmol kg- 1 sodium chloride. Diclofenac (30 mg kg- 1) was then given orally and the animals were examined 4 h later. In separate experiments we studied the effects of dietary nitrate on intragastric NO levels and mucus formation. Luminal levels of NO gas were greatly increased in nitrate-fed animals. The thickness of the mucus layer increased after nitrate supplementation and gene expression of MUC6 was upregulated in the gastric mucosa. Nitrate pretreatment dose dependently and potently reduced diclofenac-induced gastric lesions. Inflammatory activity was reduced in the rats receiving nitrate as indicated by lower mucosal myeloperoxidase activity and expression of inducible NO synthase. We conclude that dietary nitrate protects against diclofenac-induced gastric ulcers likely via enhanced nitrite-dependent intragastric NO formation and concomitant stimulation of mucus formation. Future studies will reveal if a diet rich in nitrate can offer an additional nutritional approach to preventing and treating peptic ulcer disease. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFree Radical Biology and Medicineen_US
dc.titleProtection from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric ulcers by dietary nitrateen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2006.11.018en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17275683-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846466533en_US
dc.identifier.volume42en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage510en_US
dc.identifier.epage518en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000244279200009-

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