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Article: Recent advances in video-assisted thoracoscopic approach to posterior mediastinal tumours

TitleRecent advances in video-assisted thoracoscopic approach to posterior mediastinal tumours
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Surgeon, 2010, v. 8 n. 5, p. 280-286 How to Cite?
AbstractMinimal invasive video-assisted thoracic surgery can be a safe alternative technique in the assessment, diagnosis and surgical resection of posterior mediastinal tumours. Video-assisted thoracic surgery may be particularly suited for the management of posterior mediastinal tumours as most are benign. Surgical technique continues to evolve from the classic 3-port access in order to tackle more complex tumours positioned at the apical and inferior recesses of the posterior mediastinum. The preoperative identification of dumbbell tumours is important to facilitate arrangements for a single-stage combined resection for both the intra-thoracic and intraspinal tumour. Results from Video-assisted thoracic surgery posterior mediastinal tumour resection are comparable with conventional surgical techniques in terms of symptomatic improvement, recurrence and survival. Video-assisted thoracic surgery approach has been shown to result in less post-operative pain, improved cosmesis, shorter hospital stay, and more rapid recovery and return to normal activities. In over a decade, video-assisted thoracic surgery has gradually matured and is now a promising therapeutic alternative to open approach. In certain selected patients, video-assisted thoracic surgery may be considered the standard of care for conditions of the posterior mediastinum. Recent developments in robotic surgery for the management of mediastinal tumours are promising, however, long-term results are pending. © 2010 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192678
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.046
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.737
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, CSHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, RHLen_US
dc.contributor.authorHsin, MKYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYeung, ECLen_US
dc.contributor.authorWan, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWan, IYPen_US
dc.contributor.authorYim, APCen_US
dc.contributor.authorUnderwood, MJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T04:55:12Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-20T04:55:12Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationSurgeon, 2010, v. 8 n. 5, p. 280-286en_US
dc.identifier.issn1479-666Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192678-
dc.description.abstractMinimal invasive video-assisted thoracic surgery can be a safe alternative technique in the assessment, diagnosis and surgical resection of posterior mediastinal tumours. Video-assisted thoracic surgery may be particularly suited for the management of posterior mediastinal tumours as most are benign. Surgical technique continues to evolve from the classic 3-port access in order to tackle more complex tumours positioned at the apical and inferior recesses of the posterior mediastinum. The preoperative identification of dumbbell tumours is important to facilitate arrangements for a single-stage combined resection for both the intra-thoracic and intraspinal tumour. Results from Video-assisted thoracic surgery posterior mediastinal tumour resection are comparable with conventional surgical techniques in terms of symptomatic improvement, recurrence and survival. Video-assisted thoracic surgery approach has been shown to result in less post-operative pain, improved cosmesis, shorter hospital stay, and more rapid recovery and return to normal activities. In over a decade, video-assisted thoracic surgery has gradually matured and is now a promising therapeutic alternative to open approach. In certain selected patients, video-assisted thoracic surgery may be considered the standard of care for conditions of the posterior mediastinum. Recent developments in robotic surgery for the management of mediastinal tumours are promising, however, long-term results are pending. © 2010 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSurgeonen_US
dc.titleRecent advances in video-assisted thoracoscopic approach to posterior mediastinal tumoursen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.surge.2010.06.001en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20709286-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955662676en_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage280en_US
dc.identifier.epage286en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282200000009-

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