File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Cardiac positioning using an apical suction device maintains beating heart hemodynamics

TitleCardiac positioning using an apical suction device maintains beating heart hemodynamics
Authors
Issue Date2002
Citation
Heart Surgery Forum, 2002, v. 5 n. 3, p. 279-284 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Cardiac positioning during off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) using deep pericardial sutures (DPS) typically results in some degree of hemodynamic compromise. We sought to determine whether cardiac positioning using an apical suction device was hemodynamically superior to DPS. Methods: Five healthy pigs underwent sternotomy and instrumentation to measure right atrial (RA) pressure, left ventricular (LV) pressure and volume, and aortic pressure and flow. These variables were recorded at baseline, with simple attachment of the apical suction device (Xpose™ Access Device, Guidant, Inc.), and during exposure of the posterior descending artery (PDA) and obtuse marginal (OM) branches of the left circumflex artery using DPS and the apical suction device. Results: Application of the apical suction device to the beating heart in neutral anatomic position did not result in any statistically significant change in hemodynamics compared to baseline except for a small decrease in RA pressure. DPS positioning resulted in statistically significant compromise in nearly all measured hemodynamic parameters, including cardiac output (-21% PDA, -30% OM), mean arterial pressure (-8% PDA, -26% OM), and stroke work (-31% PDA, -38% OM). In addition, LV end-diastolic pressure decreased (-59% PDA, -51% OM) while RA pressure increased (+17% PDA, +16% OM). Similar target exposure using the apical suction device resulted in near-baseline hemodynamics. The only statistically significant changes were a modest decrease in cardiac output (-18% OM) and RA pressure (-11% PDA). Conclusion: DPS positioning significantly compromises hemodynamics due to reduced LVfilling. The apical suction device provides good exposure with less hemodynamic compromise.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192657
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.343
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSepic, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWee, JOen_US
dc.contributor.authorSoltesz, EGen_US
dc.contributor.authorHsin, MKen_US
dc.contributor.authorCohn, LHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaurence, RGen_US
dc.contributor.authorAklog, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T04:54:54Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-20T04:54:54Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationHeart Surgery Forum, 2002, v. 5 n. 3, p. 279-284en_US
dc.identifier.issn1098-3511en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192657-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cardiac positioning during off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) using deep pericardial sutures (DPS) typically results in some degree of hemodynamic compromise. We sought to determine whether cardiac positioning using an apical suction device was hemodynamically superior to DPS. Methods: Five healthy pigs underwent sternotomy and instrumentation to measure right atrial (RA) pressure, left ventricular (LV) pressure and volume, and aortic pressure and flow. These variables were recorded at baseline, with simple attachment of the apical suction device (Xpose™ Access Device, Guidant, Inc.), and during exposure of the posterior descending artery (PDA) and obtuse marginal (OM) branches of the left circumflex artery using DPS and the apical suction device. Results: Application of the apical suction device to the beating heart in neutral anatomic position did not result in any statistically significant change in hemodynamics compared to baseline except for a small decrease in RA pressure. DPS positioning resulted in statistically significant compromise in nearly all measured hemodynamic parameters, including cardiac output (-21% PDA, -30% OM), mean arterial pressure (-8% PDA, -26% OM), and stroke work (-31% PDA, -38% OM). In addition, LV end-diastolic pressure decreased (-59% PDA, -51% OM) while RA pressure increased (+17% PDA, +16% OM). Similar target exposure using the apical suction device resulted in near-baseline hemodynamics. The only statistically significant changes were a modest decrease in cardiac output (-18% OM) and RA pressure (-11% PDA). Conclusion: DPS positioning significantly compromises hemodynamics due to reduced LVfilling. The apical suction device provides good exposure with less hemodynamic compromise.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHeart Surgery Forumen_US
dc.titleCardiac positioning using an apical suction device maintains beating heart hemodynamicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid12538143-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036400360en_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage279en_US
dc.identifier.epage284en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000178448100015-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats