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Conference Paper: Use of Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication in First Encounters

TitleUse of Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication in First Encounters
Authors
KeywordsBehavioral science
Education research
Effectiveness and Methodology
Issue Date2013
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The 2nd Meeting of the International Association of Dental Research - Asia Pacific Region (IADR-APR), Bangkok, Thailand, 21-23 August 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue B: abstract no. 407 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: The patient’s initial problem presentation in the first dental consultation provides an opportunity for dentists to recognize individual needs and begin to establish a therapeutic relationship. To achieve these goals, understanding how patients report their oral problems is crucial but this aspect is relatively under-explored in dental communication. This qualitative study identifies how patients routinely present oral concerns in initial consultations. Methods: 70 initial dental consultations from the primary care unit in a dental teaching hospital in Hong Kong were recorded, transcribed, and sequentially analysed. Analysis of videos and transcripts of patient problem presentation episodes were undertaken to identify presentational modes. Results: Whilst all oral problems were conversationally achieved, two presentation types were identified across the corpus of recordings. The most frequent type was gestural+talk (87%, n=61) as characterized by patients indicating specific oral problem sites using a finger or hand with the corresponding explanation. The remaining 13% (n=9) of cases belonged to verbal whereby patients presented their oral problems to their dentists through talk only. Conclusion: Patients tend to present their initial oral problems by gestures. To enhance the quality of dentist-patient communication, dentists need to attend to patients’ non-verbal signals during talk in clinical encounters.
DescriptionConference Theme: We are the Future
Oral Presentation
Session 20: O8
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192577
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, SSen_US
dc.contributor.authorBridges, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, CKYen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-18T05:06:47Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-18T05:06:47Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2nd Meeting of the International Association of Dental Research - Asia Pacific Region (IADR-APR), Bangkok, Thailand, 21-23 August 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 n. Special Issue B: abstract no. 407en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192577-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: We are the Future-
dc.descriptionOral Presentation-
dc.descriptionSession 20: O8-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The patient’s initial problem presentation in the first dental consultation provides an opportunity for dentists to recognize individual needs and begin to establish a therapeutic relationship. To achieve these goals, understanding how patients report their oral problems is crucial but this aspect is relatively under-explored in dental communication. This qualitative study identifies how patients routinely present oral concerns in initial consultations. Methods: 70 initial dental consultations from the primary care unit in a dental teaching hospital in Hong Kong were recorded, transcribed, and sequentially analysed. Analysis of videos and transcripts of patient problem presentation episodes were undertaken to identify presentational modes. Results: Whilst all oral problems were conversationally achieved, two presentation types were identified across the corpus of recordings. The most frequent type was gestural+talk (87%, n=61) as characterized by patients indicating specific oral problem sites using a finger or hand with the corresponding explanation. The remaining 13% (n=9) of cases belonged to verbal whereby patients presented their oral problems to their dentists through talk only. Conclusion: Patients tend to present their initial oral problems by gestures. To enhance the quality of dentist-patient communication, dentists need to attend to patients’ non-verbal signals during talk in clinical encounters.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectBehavioral science-
dc.subjectEducation research-
dc.subjectEffectiveness and Methodology-
dc.titleUse of Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication in First Encountersen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailBridges, SM: sbridges@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, CKY: ckyyiu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBridges, SM=rp00048en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, CKY=rp00018en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, CPJ=rp00037en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros226807en_US
dc.identifier.volume92en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpecial Issue B: abstract no. 407en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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