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postgraduate thesis: Neurocogntive and psychosocial functioning in nonapneic snoringadults

TitleNeurocogntive and psychosocial functioning in nonapneic snoringadults
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Yeung, W. [楊慧敏]. (2012). Neurocogntive and psychosocial functioning in nonapneic snoring adults. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5070062
AbstractIn view of the high prevalence of nonapneic snoring adults and the inadequate understanding of the impact of this condition independent of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), this study investigates the neurocognitive and psychosocial functioning of 34 nonapneic snoring adults, 25 OSA patients, and 30 healthy control subjects using ANOVA with post hoc comparisons. Exploratory regression analysis was also carried out to investigate evidence of sleepiness or sleep efficiency as explanations for the effect of nonapneic snoring in nonapneic snorers’ functioning. Nonapneic snorers showed worse performance in various cognitive domains, including attention, working memory, verbal memory, and semantic fluency. Nonapenic snorers’ impairment in psychosocial functioning was identified. The daytime sleepiness of these individuals was significantly higher with lower sleep quality. Results also showed these individuals as more depressive, anxious, stressful, having lower quality of life, and experiencing problems with their daily functioning. In addition to sleep efficiency and sleepiness, sleep quality was also identified as one of the predictors for the psychosocial functioning of nonapneic snorers. Yet, none of the sleep variables was associated with the neurocognitive functioning. This study provides a comprehensive neuropsychosocial profile of nonapneic adults and specifies impaired areas that may warrant clinical attention. This study aims to increase awareness of breathing issues and their aversive impacts. Future research directions, such as investigating the effects of nonapneic snoring on the functioning and treatment efficacy of snoring reduction, are also suggested.
DegreeMaster of Social Sciences
SubjectSnoring.
Dept/ProgramClinical Psychology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192401

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, Wai-man-
dc.contributor.author楊慧敏-
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-03T04:23:54Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-03T04:23:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationYeung, W. [楊慧敏]. (2012). Neurocogntive and psychosocial functioning in nonapneic snoring adults. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5070062-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192401-
dc.description.abstractIn view of the high prevalence of nonapneic snoring adults and the inadequate understanding of the impact of this condition independent of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), this study investigates the neurocognitive and psychosocial functioning of 34 nonapneic snoring adults, 25 OSA patients, and 30 healthy control subjects using ANOVA with post hoc comparisons. Exploratory regression analysis was also carried out to investigate evidence of sleepiness or sleep efficiency as explanations for the effect of nonapneic snoring in nonapneic snorers’ functioning. Nonapneic snorers showed worse performance in various cognitive domains, including attention, working memory, verbal memory, and semantic fluency. Nonapenic snorers’ impairment in psychosocial functioning was identified. The daytime sleepiness of these individuals was significantly higher with lower sleep quality. Results also showed these individuals as more depressive, anxious, stressful, having lower quality of life, and experiencing problems with their daily functioning. In addition to sleep efficiency and sleepiness, sleep quality was also identified as one of the predictors for the psychosocial functioning of nonapneic snorers. Yet, none of the sleep variables was associated with the neurocognitive functioning. This study provides a comprehensive neuropsychosocial profile of nonapneic adults and specifies impaired areas that may warrant clinical attention. This study aims to increase awareness of breathing issues and their aversive impacts. Future research directions, such as investigating the effects of nonapneic snoring on the functioning and treatment efficacy of snoring reduction, are also suggested.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B50700625-
dc.subject.lcshSnoring.-
dc.titleNeurocogntive and psychosocial functioning in nonapneic snoringadults-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5070062-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Social Sciences-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineClinical Psychology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5070062-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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