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Conference Paper: The safety and efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells for prevention or regeneration of intervertebral disc degeneration: a systematic review

TitleThe safety and efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells for prevention or regeneration of intervertebral disc degeneration: a systematic review
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherInstitute for Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy.
Citation
The 40th Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Lumbar Spine (ISSLS 2013), Scottsdale, AZ., 13-17 May 2013. In Abstract Proceedings, 2013, p. 159-160, abstract no. GP86 How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to halt the progression or regenerate the disc with hopes to prevent or treat discogenic back pain. However, the safety and efficacy of the use of MSCs for such treatment in animal and human models at short and long term assessment (i.e. greater than 48 weeks) have not been systematically addressed. This study addressed a systematic review of comparative controlled studies addressing the use of MSCs to that of no treatment/saline for the treatment of disc degeneration. METHODS: Online databases were extensively searched. Controlled trials in animal models and humans were eligible for inclusion. Trial design, MSC characteristics, injection method, disc assessment, outcome intervals, and complication events were assessed. Validity of each study was assessed addressing trial design. Two individuals independently addressed the aforementioned. RESULTS: Twenty-two animal studies were included. No human comparative controlled trials were reported. All three types of MSCs (i.e. derived from bone marrow, synovial and adipose tissue) showed successful inhibition of disc degeneration progression. From three included studies, bone marrow derived MSC showed superior quality of disc repair when compared to other treatments, including TGF-β1, NP bilaminar co-culture and axial distraction regimen. However, osteophyte development was reported in two studies as potential complication of MSC transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on animal models, the current evidence suggests that in the short-term MSC transplantation is safe and effective in halting disc degeneration; however, additional and larger studies are needed to assess the long-term regenerative effects and potential complications. Inconsistency in methodological design and outcome parameters prevent any robust conclusions. In addition, randomized controlled trials in humans are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of such therapy.
DescriptionGeneral Posters: abstract no. GP86
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/191678

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYim, RLH-
dc.contributor.authorLee, JTY-
dc.contributor.authorVavken, P-
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, D-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-15T07:16:56Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-15T07:16:56Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationThe 40th Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Lumbar Spine (ISSLS 2013), Scottsdale, AZ., 13-17 May 2013. In Abstract Proceedings, 2013, p. 159-160, abstract no. GP86-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/191678-
dc.descriptionGeneral Posters: abstract no. GP86-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to halt the progression or regenerate the disc with hopes to prevent or treat discogenic back pain. However, the safety and efficacy of the use of MSCs for such treatment in animal and human models at short and long term assessment (i.e. greater than 48 weeks) have not been systematically addressed. This study addressed a systematic review of comparative controlled studies addressing the use of MSCs to that of no treatment/saline for the treatment of disc degeneration. METHODS: Online databases were extensively searched. Controlled trials in animal models and humans were eligible for inclusion. Trial design, MSC characteristics, injection method, disc assessment, outcome intervals, and complication events were assessed. Validity of each study was assessed addressing trial design. Two individuals independently addressed the aforementioned. RESULTS: Twenty-two animal studies were included. No human comparative controlled trials were reported. All three types of MSCs (i.e. derived from bone marrow, synovial and adipose tissue) showed successful inhibition of disc degeneration progression. From three included studies, bone marrow derived MSC showed superior quality of disc repair when compared to other treatments, including TGF-β1, NP bilaminar co-culture and axial distraction regimen. However, osteophyte development was reported in two studies as potential complication of MSC transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on animal models, the current evidence suggests that in the short-term MSC transplantation is safe and effective in halting disc degeneration; however, additional and larger studies are needed to assess the long-term regenerative effects and potential complications. Inconsistency in methodological design and outcome parameters prevent any robust conclusions. In addition, randomized controlled trials in humans are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of such therapy.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherInstitute for Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy.-
dc.relation.ispartofAbstract Proceedings of 40th ISSLS Annual Meeting 2013-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleThe safety and efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells for prevention or regeneration of intervertebral disc degeneration: a systematic review-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros226448-
dc.identifier.spage159-
dc.identifier.epage160-
dc.publisher.placeGothenburg, Sweden-

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