File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Article: Where have all the people gone? Some reflections on civil society and regime stability in the People’s Republic of China

TitleWhere have all the people gone? Some reflections on civil society and regime stability in the People’s Republic of China
Authors
KeywordsCivil society
Chinese politics
Authoritarian regime
Social movement
Issue Date2012
PublisherTaiwan Foundation of Democracy. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tfd.org.tw/english/tjd.php
Citation
Taiwan Journal of Democracy, 2012, v. 8 n. 2, p. 17-24 How to Cite?
AbstractThe past two decades have witnessed the unprecedented proliferation of civil-society organizations across China. Yet, contrary to what many political scientists predicted, this proliferation has led neither to the formation of a strong political opposition, nor to any organized anti-systemic social movement. The author of this essay argues that this is due to the unique characteristics of the post-Mao Chinese civil society-including its functional depoliticization, conformity to the ruling regime, supplemental role in service provision, symbiotic relationship with the local authorities, as well as the lack of an engaged intelligentsia who can provide guidance and assume leadership. Combining with the consistent party-state control and the distance between Chinese civil society and the country's burgeoning contentious movements at the grassroots, the inherent weaknesses of contemporary Chinese civil society may have predetermined its limited potential in affecting systematic political change up till today.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/191482
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYan, Xen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-15T07:03:01Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-15T07:03:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationTaiwan Journal of Democracy, 2012, v. 8 n. 2, p. 17-24en_US
dc.identifier.issn1815-7238-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/191482-
dc.description.abstractThe past two decades have witnessed the unprecedented proliferation of civil-society organizations across China. Yet, contrary to what many political scientists predicted, this proliferation has led neither to the formation of a strong political opposition, nor to any organized anti-systemic social movement. The author of this essay argues that this is due to the unique characteristics of the post-Mao Chinese civil society-including its functional depoliticization, conformity to the ruling regime, supplemental role in service provision, symbiotic relationship with the local authorities, as well as the lack of an engaged intelligentsia who can provide guidance and assume leadership. Combining with the consistent party-state control and the distance between Chinese civil society and the country's burgeoning contentious movements at the grassroots, the inherent weaknesses of contemporary Chinese civil society may have predetermined its limited potential in affecting systematic political change up till today.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaiwan Foundation of Democracy. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tfd.org.tw/english/tjd.php-
dc.relation.ispartofTaiwan Journal of Democracyen_US
dc.subjectCivil society-
dc.subjectChinese politics-
dc.subjectAuthoritarian regime-
dc.subjectSocial movement-
dc.titleWhere have all the people gone? Some reflections on civil society and regime stability in the People’s Republic of Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYan, X: xyan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYan, X=rp00644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros226543en_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage17en_US
dc.identifier.epage24en_US
dc.publisher.placeTaiwan-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats