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Book Chapter: Linguistic Landscape, Law and Reflexive Modernity

TitleLinguistic Landscape, Law and Reflexive Modernity
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Linguistic Landscape, Law and Reflexive Modernity. In Wagner, A & Sherwin, RK (Eds.), Law, Culture and Visual Studies, p. 599-613. Dordrecht; London: Springer, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractThis chapter links the linguistic landscape, that is, the visible texts in the modern urban environment, to the evolution of law within what has been termed ‘reflexive modernity’. A major symptom of reflexive modernity is the rise of ‘managerial’ modes of governances. Law and regulation are blurred within juridification, and the citizen is positioned simultaneously as subject to rules and as the consumer of state services under a civic contract. Signage in the cityscape merges legal warnings, regulatory advice and exhortatory appeals. Law, regulation and civic responsibility are not clearly—semiotically—distinguished. These processes are illustrated using examples from Hong Kong and mainland China. In Hong Kong, the cityscape shows increasing density of regulatory signs, safety warnings and appeals to citizens to adopt appropriate modes of behaviour. In mainland China, the linguistic landscape has been semiotically softened, with similar exhortatory appeals and cartoon-like figures representing the police. The citizen is situated in this process as a consumer-partner rather than merely the subject of law’s disciplinary control. Managerial modes of governance are visible at immigration checkpoints, with the ‘traveller-consumer’ invited to evaluate the ‘service’. It is argued that there is a degree of convergence in the linguistic landscape of these two very different jurisdictions (both within the People’s Republic of China) which reflects the rise of reflexive modernity and managerial modes of governance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190360
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHutton, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T15:20:49Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T15:20:49Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationLinguistic Landscape, Law and Reflexive Modernity. In Wagner, A & Sherwin, RK (Eds.), Law, Culture and Visual Studies, p. 599-613. Dordrecht; London: Springer, 2014en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9789048193219en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190360-
dc.description.abstractThis chapter links the linguistic landscape, that is, the visible texts in the modern urban environment, to the evolution of law within what has been termed ‘reflexive modernity’. A major symptom of reflexive modernity is the rise of ‘managerial’ modes of governances. Law and regulation are blurred within juridification, and the citizen is positioned simultaneously as subject to rules and as the consumer of state services under a civic contract. Signage in the cityscape merges legal warnings, regulatory advice and exhortatory appeals. Law, regulation and civic responsibility are not clearly—semiotically—distinguished. These processes are illustrated using examples from Hong Kong and mainland China. In Hong Kong, the cityscape shows increasing density of regulatory signs, safety warnings and appeals to citizens to adopt appropriate modes of behaviour. In mainland China, the linguistic landscape has been semiotically softened, with similar exhortatory appeals and cartoon-like figures representing the police. The citizen is situated in this process as a consumer-partner rather than merely the subject of law’s disciplinary control. Managerial modes of governance are visible at immigration checkpoints, with the ‘traveller-consumer’ invited to evaluate the ‘service’. It is argued that there is a degree of convergence in the linguistic landscape of these two very different jurisdictions (both within the People’s Republic of China) which reflects the rise of reflexive modernity and managerial modes of governance.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofLaw, Culture and Visual Studiesen_US
dc.titleLinguistic Landscape, Law and Reflexive Modernityen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailHutton, CM: chutton@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHutton, CM=rp01161en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-90-481-9322-6_26-
dc.identifier.hkuros223760en_US
dc.identifier.spage599en_US
dc.identifier.epage613en_US
dc.publisher.placeDordrecht; Londonen_US

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