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Conference Paper: Challenges of simulating undrained tests using the constant volume method in DEM

TitleChallenges of simulating undrained tests using the constant volume method in DEM
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics. The Journal's web site is located at http://proceedings.aip.org/
Citation
The 7th International Conference on Micromechanics of Granular Media: Powders and Grains 2013, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 8 -12 July 2013. In AIP Conference Proceedings, 2013, v. 1542, p. 277-280 How to Cite?
AbstractLiquefaction during earthquakes can cause significant infrastructural damage and loss of life, motivating a fundamental study of undrained sand response using discrete element modeling (DEM). Two methods are widely used in DEM for simulating the undrained response of soil. One approach is to numerically couple the DEM code with a fluid model. Alternatively, if the soil is fully saturated and water is assumed to be incompressible, the volume of the sample can be held constant to simulate an undrained test. The latter has the advantage of being computationally straightforward, but the assumption of a constant volume can cause some issues which are discussed in this paper. Depending on the contact model selected, extremely high deviatoric stresses and pore water pressures can be generated for dense samples using the constant volume approach which are not observed in corresponding laboratory tests. Furthermore the results of these constant volume simulations tend to be sensitive to the strain rate selected. The evolution of particle size distribution caused by grain crushing is also ignored in most undrained simulations. For these reasons, authors often restrict the extent of the data presented to physically-realistic ranges and report results in non-dimensional terms, e.g., using stress ratios (q/p’) or stresses normalized by the initial confining pressure. This paper aims to highlight some of these issues, explore whether the constant volume approach is appropriate and make recommendations for future analysis of undrained soil behavior using DEM. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190287
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHanley, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwok, CYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T15:17:02Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T15:17:02Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 7th International Conference on Micromechanics of Granular Media: Powders and Grains 2013, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 8 -12 July 2013. In AIP Conference Proceedings, 2013, v. 1542, p. 277-280en_US
dc.identifier.issn0094-243X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190287-
dc.description.abstractLiquefaction during earthquakes can cause significant infrastructural damage and loss of life, motivating a fundamental study of undrained sand response using discrete element modeling (DEM). Two methods are widely used in DEM for simulating the undrained response of soil. One approach is to numerically couple the DEM code with a fluid model. Alternatively, if the soil is fully saturated and water is assumed to be incompressible, the volume of the sample can be held constant to simulate an undrained test. The latter has the advantage of being computationally straightforward, but the assumption of a constant volume can cause some issues which are discussed in this paper. Depending on the contact model selected, extremely high deviatoric stresses and pore water pressures can be generated for dense samples using the constant volume approach which are not observed in corresponding laboratory tests. Furthermore the results of these constant volume simulations tend to be sensitive to the strain rate selected. The evolution of particle size distribution caused by grain crushing is also ignored in most undrained simulations. For these reasons, authors often restrict the extent of the data presented to physically-realistic ranges and report results in non-dimensional terms, e.g., using stress ratios (q/p’) or stresses normalized by the initial confining pressure. This paper aims to highlight some of these issues, explore whether the constant volume approach is appropriate and make recommendations for future analysis of undrained soil behavior using DEM. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Institute of Physics. The Journal's web site is located at http://proceedings.aip.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofAIP Conference Proceedingsen_US
dc.rightsAIP Conference Proceedings. Copyright © American Institute of Physics.-
dc.rightsCopyright (2013) American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Institute of Physics. The following article appeared in AIP Conference Proceedings, 2013, v. 1542, p. 277-280 and may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4811921.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleChallenges of simulating undrained tests using the constant volume method in DEMen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailKwok, CY: fkwok8@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKwok, CY=rp01344en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1063/1.4811921-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84880762201-
dc.identifier.hkuros224122en_US
dc.identifier.volume1542-
dc.identifier.spage277-
dc.identifier.epage280-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000321003200064-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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