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Article: The associations of asthma symptoms with active and passive smoking in Hong Kong adolescents

TitleThe associations of asthma symptoms with active and passive smoking in Hong Kong adolescents
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherDaedalus Enterprises, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.rcjournal.com
Citation
Respiratory Care, 2012, v. 57 n. 9, p. 1398-1404 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Tobacco smoke has detrimental effects on the respiratory system. This study investigated the associations of active and passive smoking with asthma symptoms in Hong Kong adolescents. METHODS: A total of 6,494 Hong Kong secondary school students, with a mean +/- SD age of 15.0 +/- 1.21 years, participated in the Health Related Behavior General Survey in 2000-2001. They reported their demographic factors (sex, age, housing type, district of living), lifestyles (smoking, drinking, extracurricular sports, eating), and asthma symptoms (exercise-induced bronchospasm [EIB] and nocturnal cough) in the questionnaire. In addition, number of smoking parents (none/one/both) and presence of a smoking best friend (yes/no) were assessed. Logistic regression models were used to determine the odds ratios (OR) of frequently having the asthma symptoms for different smoking status of students, parents, and best friend, with adjustment for demographic factors and lifestyles. RESULTS: The prevalence of former, light, and heavy smokers was 17.5%, 7.7%, and 1.0%, respectively. Moreover, 35.1% of the participants had one and 3.8% had 2 parents who smoked. Heavy smokers were more likely to experience EIB with OR (95% CI) of 2.27 (1.30-3.97) and nocturnal cough with OR (95% CI) of 3.45 (1.52-7.81), as well as both symptoms with OR (95% CI) = 4.69 (1.88-11.73) when compared to those who never smoked. The corresponding OR (95% CI) for having at least one smoking parent and a smoking best friend was 1.45 (1.17-1.81), 1.61 (1.06-2.42), and 2.43 (1.37-4.31), when compared with those without a parent or best friend who smoked. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents who are heavy smokers and having parents and a best friend who smoke are more likely than others to have asthma symptoms. Both active and passive smoking are related to asthma symptoms in adolescents.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189494
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.922
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.761
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMAK, KKen_US
dc.contributor.authorDay, JRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T14:43:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T14:43:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationRespiratory Care, 2012, v. 57 n. 9, p. 1398-1404en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-1324en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189494-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Tobacco smoke has detrimental effects on the respiratory system. This study investigated the associations of active and passive smoking with asthma symptoms in Hong Kong adolescents. METHODS: A total of 6,494 Hong Kong secondary school students, with a mean +/- SD age of 15.0 +/- 1.21 years, participated in the Health Related Behavior General Survey in 2000-2001. They reported their demographic factors (sex, age, housing type, district of living), lifestyles (smoking, drinking, extracurricular sports, eating), and asthma symptoms (exercise-induced bronchospasm [EIB] and nocturnal cough) in the questionnaire. In addition, number of smoking parents (none/one/both) and presence of a smoking best friend (yes/no) were assessed. Logistic regression models were used to determine the odds ratios (OR) of frequently having the asthma symptoms for different smoking status of students, parents, and best friend, with adjustment for demographic factors and lifestyles. RESULTS: The prevalence of former, light, and heavy smokers was 17.5%, 7.7%, and 1.0%, respectively. Moreover, 35.1% of the participants had one and 3.8% had 2 parents who smoked. Heavy smokers were more likely to experience EIB with OR (95% CI) of 2.27 (1.30-3.97) and nocturnal cough with OR (95% CI) of 3.45 (1.52-7.81), as well as both symptoms with OR (95% CI) = 4.69 (1.88-11.73) when compared to those who never smoked. The corresponding OR (95% CI) for having at least one smoking parent and a smoking best friend was 1.45 (1.17-1.81), 1.61 (1.06-2.42), and 2.43 (1.37-4.31), when compared with those without a parent or best friend who smoked. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents who are heavy smokers and having parents and a best friend who smoke are more likely than others to have asthma symptoms. Both active and passive smoking are related to asthma symptoms in adolescents.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDaedalus Enterprises, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.rcjournal.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofRespiratory Careen_US
dc.subject.meshAsthma, Exercise-Induced - epidemiology - etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCough - epidemiology - etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshSmoking - adverse effects - epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - statistics and numerical dataen_US
dc.titleThe associations of asthma symptoms with active and passive smoking in Hong Kong adolescentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDay, JR: jrday@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.4187/respcare.01548en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22348876en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros223364en_US
dc.identifier.volume57en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage1398en_US
dc.identifier.epage1404en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308901700004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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