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Article: Understanding Sheng Nu (“Leftover Women”): the Phenomenon of Late Marriage among Chinese Professional Women

TitleUnderstanding Sheng Nu (“Leftover Women”): the Phenomenon of Late Marriage among Chinese Professional Women
Authors
KeywordsChinese professional women
Sheng nu (“leftover women”)
Late marriage
Interactionist grounded theory method
Patriarchy
Issue Date2013
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ucpressjournals.com/journaljoin.php?j=si
Citation
Symbolic Interaction, 2013, v. 36 n. 1, p. 1-20 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the past few decades, there has been a rise in the number of single, unmarried Chinese professional women, which is known as the sheng nu or 'leftover women' phenomenon. Through an interactionist grounded theory method, this study has located the interactional constraints faced by 50 single Chinese professional women that were issued by their male romantic partners and parents, respectively. 'Discriminatory' and 'controlling' gendered constraints issued by the women's male suitors and partners reflected the persistence of the Chinese patriarchal structure, and this was found to be the leading cause of the women being 'leftover' in the marriage market. Parents' traditional views continued to exert strong influences on the women's marital choices, but this was seen to conflict with their more 'modern' views toward advocating and supporting the women's strong economic achievements. The four different types of Chinese professional women that were constructed based on their different partner choice strategies not only gave rise to an in-depth and nuanced understanding of the sheng nu phenomenon in China, but could also be generalized toward understanding the marital choices of single professional women in other patriarchal societies who faced similar dilemmas in reconciling interactional constraints imposed by men and parents alike. Video Abstract. © 2013 Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189432
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.824
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.514
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTo, SSCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T14:40:38Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T14:40:38Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationSymbolic Interaction, 2013, v. 36 n. 1, p. 1-20en_US
dc.identifier.issn0195-6086-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/189432-
dc.description.abstractIn the past few decades, there has been a rise in the number of single, unmarried Chinese professional women, which is known as the sheng nu or 'leftover women' phenomenon. Through an interactionist grounded theory method, this study has located the interactional constraints faced by 50 single Chinese professional women that were issued by their male romantic partners and parents, respectively. 'Discriminatory' and 'controlling' gendered constraints issued by the women's male suitors and partners reflected the persistence of the Chinese patriarchal structure, and this was found to be the leading cause of the women being 'leftover' in the marriage market. Parents' traditional views continued to exert strong influences on the women's marital choices, but this was seen to conflict with their more 'modern' views toward advocating and supporting the women's strong economic achievements. The four different types of Chinese professional women that were constructed based on their different partner choice strategies not only gave rise to an in-depth and nuanced understanding of the sheng nu phenomenon in China, but could also be generalized toward understanding the marital choices of single professional women in other patriarchal societies who faced similar dilemmas in reconciling interactional constraints imposed by men and parents alike. Video Abstract. © 2013 Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ucpressjournals.com/journaljoin.php?j=sien_US
dc.relation.ispartofSymbolic Interactionen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.comen_US
dc.subjectChinese professional women-
dc.subjectSheng nu (“leftover women”)-
dc.subjectLate marriage-
dc.subjectInteractionist grounded theory method-
dc.subjectPatriarchy-
dc.titleUnderstanding Sheng Nu (“Leftover Women”): the Phenomenon of Late Marriage among Chinese Professional Womenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTo, SSC: sandyscto@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/symb.46-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84875423206-
dc.identifier.hkuros223989en_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage20en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000314927000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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