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Article: Healthy longevity and health care service needs: a pilot study of the centenarians in Hong Kong

TitleHealthy longevity and health care service needs: a pilot study of the centenarians in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsAged, 80 and over
Aging
Health services
Hong Kong
Issue Date2012
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkag.org/Publications/AJGG/Publications_AJGG.htm
Citation
Asian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2012, v. 7 n. 1, p. 26-32. How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. More Hong Kong older adults are surviving to advanced ages. There has been a 5.5-fold increase in the number of centenarians over the past few decades. Nonetheless, elderly people are mostly considered to be an under-represented minority. This pilot study aimed to characterise the health profile of the Hong Kong community-dwelling centenarians and to identify their health care service needs. Methods. From September to November 2009, of 33 community-dwelling centenarians and their family members invited from 56 district elderly community centres, 20 agreed to participate (response rate, 67%) and 3 dropped out (drop-out rate, 9%). Two validated instruments (Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey and Elderly Health Center questionnaire) were administered through face-to-face interviews. Data collected included information on family structure, general functioning, activities of daily living, physical health, and cognitive function. Relevant demographic, socioeconomic, and environmental data were also collected. Results. Approximately half of the participants rated their health as very good/good. Half of the participants obtained Mini Mental State Examination scores of >23 (total score, 30). Approximately two-thirds of participants had no difficulty in activities of daily living. Cataract was the most common disease, followed by hypertension and diabetes. More than two-thirds of the participants considered movement and health issues to be major factors preventing them from engaging in social contact, followed by transportation problems and cost. Participants’ daughters, where available, were considered the primary caregivers at times of sickness. Conclusions. To avoid the loss of activities of daily life and functional capability, it is important not to have serious chronic diseases. Economic affluence and family support play a role in minimising the risk of institutionalisation and achieving ageing at home.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188729
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.116

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, SLK-
dc.contributor.authorYip, SFP-
dc.contributor.authorChi, I-
dc.contributor.authorChui, WTE-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, YMA-
dc.contributor.authorChan, HWF-
dc.contributor.authorChan, MYG-
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-05T09:13:22Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-05T09:13:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationAsian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2012, v. 7 n. 1, p. 26-32.-
dc.identifier.issn1819-1576-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188729-
dc.description.abstractBackground. More Hong Kong older adults are surviving to advanced ages. There has been a 5.5-fold increase in the number of centenarians over the past few decades. Nonetheless, elderly people are mostly considered to be an under-represented minority. This pilot study aimed to characterise the health profile of the Hong Kong community-dwelling centenarians and to identify their health care service needs. Methods. From September to November 2009, of 33 community-dwelling centenarians and their family members invited from 56 district elderly community centres, 20 agreed to participate (response rate, 67%) and 3 dropped out (drop-out rate, 9%). Two validated instruments (Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey and Elderly Health Center questionnaire) were administered through face-to-face interviews. Data collected included information on family structure, general functioning, activities of daily living, physical health, and cognitive function. Relevant demographic, socioeconomic, and environmental data were also collected. Results. Approximately half of the participants rated their health as very good/good. Half of the participants obtained Mini Mental State Examination scores of >23 (total score, 30). Approximately two-thirds of participants had no difficulty in activities of daily living. Cataract was the most common disease, followed by hypertension and diabetes. More than two-thirds of the participants considered movement and health issues to be major factors preventing them from engaging in social contact, followed by transportation problems and cost. Participants’ daughters, where available, were considered the primary caregivers at times of sickness. Conclusions. To avoid the loss of activities of daily life and functional capability, it is important not to have serious chronic diseases. Economic affluence and family support play a role in minimising the risk of institutionalisation and achieving ageing at home.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkag.org/Publications/AJGG/Publications_AJGG.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics-
dc.rightsAsian Journal of Gerontology and Geriatrics. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over-
dc.subjectAging-
dc.subjectHealth services-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.titleHealthy longevity and health care service needs: a pilot study of the centenarians in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, SLK: cslk@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChui, EWT: ernest@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros221286-
dc.identifier.hkuros229421-
dc.identifier.volume7-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage26-
dc.identifier.epage32.-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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