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Article: Adverse events of acupuncture: A systematic review of case reports

TitleAdverse events of acupuncture: A systematic review of case reports
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherHindawi Publishing Corporation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/
Citation
Evidence-Based Complementary And Alternative Medicine, 2013, v. 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractAcupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping, important in traditional Eastern medicine, are increasingly used in the West. Their widening acceptance demands continual safety assessment. This review, a sequel to one our team published 10 years ago, is an evaluation of the frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs) reported for acupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping between 2000 and 2011. Relevant English-language reports in six databases were identified and assessed by two reviewers. During this 12-year period, 117 reports of 308 AEs from 25 countries and regions were associated with acupuncture (294 cases), moxibustion (4 cases), or cupping (10 cases). Country of occurrence, patient's sex and age, and outcome were extracted. Infections, mycobacterial, staphylococcal, and others, were the main complication of acupuncture. In the previous review, we found the main source of infection to be hepatitis, caused by reusable needles. In this review, we found the majority of infections to be bacterial, caused by skin contact at acupoint sites; we found no cases of hepatitis. Although the route of infection had changed, infections were still the major complication of acupuncture. Clearly, guidelines such as Clean Needle Technique must be followed in order to minimize acupuncture AEs. © 2013 Shifen Xu et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188664
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.931
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.615
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorManheimer, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorBerman, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorShen, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:58Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:58Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationEvidence-Based Complementary And Alternative Medicine, 2013, v. 2013en_US
dc.identifier.issn1741-427Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188664-
dc.description.abstractAcupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping, important in traditional Eastern medicine, are increasingly used in the West. Their widening acceptance demands continual safety assessment. This review, a sequel to one our team published 10 years ago, is an evaluation of the frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs) reported for acupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping between 2000 and 2011. Relevant English-language reports in six databases were identified and assessed by two reviewers. During this 12-year period, 117 reports of 308 AEs from 25 countries and regions were associated with acupuncture (294 cases), moxibustion (4 cases), or cupping (10 cases). Country of occurrence, patient's sex and age, and outcome were extracted. Infections, mycobacterial, staphylococcal, and others, were the main complication of acupuncture. In the previous review, we found the main source of infection to be hepatitis, caused by reusable needles. In this review, we found the majority of infections to be bacterial, caused by skin contact at acupoint sites; we found no cases of hepatitis. Although the route of infection had changed, infections were still the major complication of acupuncture. Clearly, guidelines such as Clean Needle Technique must be followed in order to minimize acupuncture AEs. © 2013 Shifen Xu et al.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHindawi Publishing Corporation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEvidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicineen_US
dc.titleAdverse events of acupuncture: A systematic review of case reportsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2013/581203en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84876575323en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84876575323&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume2013en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000316881800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, S=55659810100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, L=46961457900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCooper, E=55658391800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, M=55658569600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridManheimer, E=6602167853en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerman, B=35458606800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShen, X=55636644700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US

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