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Article: Effects of electroacupuncture on depression in a rat model

TitleEffects of electroacupuncture on depression in a rat model
Authors
Issue Date2011
Citation
Acupuncture And Electro-Therapeutics Research, 2011, v. 36 n. 3-4, p. 259-273 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective To investigate the antidepressant-like effect of electroacupuncture (EA) in a validated rat model. Methods. Wistar Kyoto rats, a valid animal model of depression, were randomly divided into two groups, EA (n=7) and placebo control (n=6). EA treatment was given once a day, 5 days a week, for 3 weeks. Two acupoints, GV14 (Dazhui) and GV20 (Baihui), respectively on 2 the cervical spine and scalp, were selected. EA frequency was held constant at 2Hz (2 pulses/second), pulse width 0.3-ms, and intensity was adjusted to 3 mA. Forced swim tests (FST), open field tests (OFT; e.g., a. rearing and grooming, b. distance traveled within a central area, c. time spent in central area, and d. total distance traveled), and the Morris Water Maze test (MWM) were conducted 3 weeks after the initial treatment. Results. In the FST, there was significant difference between EA and control (P<0.05) in immobility. In the OFT, there were significant differences between EA and control (P<0.05) in rearing and grooming (P<0.05). In the MWM, there were significant differences between treatment and control in frequency of crossing the platform (P<0.05) and its surrounding area (P<0.05). Conclusion. Our data demonstrate that EA enhances memory and improves depression-related behaviors in a rat model of depression. This suggests that the modality may have therapeutic effects on depression in humans. Electroacupuncture may act on depression by protecting nerve cells in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Communication Corp. Printed in the USA.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188646
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.778
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.440
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorShen, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeng, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:50Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationAcupuncture And Electro-Therapeutics Research, 2011, v. 36 n. 3-4, p. 259-273en_US
dc.identifier.issn0360-1293en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188646-
dc.description.abstractObjective To investigate the antidepressant-like effect of electroacupuncture (EA) in a validated rat model. Methods. Wistar Kyoto rats, a valid animal model of depression, were randomly divided into two groups, EA (n=7) and placebo control (n=6). EA treatment was given once a day, 5 days a week, for 3 weeks. Two acupoints, GV14 (Dazhui) and GV20 (Baihui), respectively on 2 the cervical spine and scalp, were selected. EA frequency was held constant at 2Hz (2 pulses/second), pulse width 0.3-ms, and intensity was adjusted to 3 mA. Forced swim tests (FST), open field tests (OFT; e.g., a. rearing and grooming, b. distance traveled within a central area, c. time spent in central area, and d. total distance traveled), and the Morris Water Maze test (MWM) were conducted 3 weeks after the initial treatment. Results. In the FST, there was significant difference between EA and control (P<0.05) in immobility. In the OFT, there were significant differences between EA and control (P<0.05) in rearing and grooming (P<0.05). In the MWM, there were significant differences between treatment and control in frequency of crossing the platform (P<0.05) and its surrounding area (P<0.05). Conclusion. Our data demonstrate that EA enhances memory and improves depression-related behaviors in a rat model of depression. This suggests that the modality may have therapeutic effects on depression in humans. Electroacupuncture may act on depression by protecting nerve cells in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Communication Corp. Printed in the USA.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAcupuncture and Electro-Therapeutics Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Pointsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshDepression - Physiopathology - Psychology - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Models, Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshElectroacupunctureen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaze Learningen_US
dc.subject.meshMemoryen_US
dc.subject.meshRandom Allocationen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Inbred Wkyen_US
dc.subject.meshSwimmingen_US
dc.titleEffects of electroacupuncture on depression in a rat modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid22443027-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84858168885en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84858168885&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_US
dc.identifier.spage259en_US
dc.identifier.epage273en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300655000003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, S=18435697200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, S=36063540000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShen, X=7402721090en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMeng, X=53064279800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US

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