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Article: Is acupuncture safe? A systematic review of case reports

TitleIs acupuncture safe? A systematic review of case reports
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherInnoVision Communications. The Journal's web site is located at www.alternative-therapies.com
Citation
Alternative Therapies In Health And Medicine, 2003, v. 9 n. 1, p. 72-83 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: The greater acceptance of acupuncture by healthcare professionals and the public has increased the importance of addressing public concern about its safety. Of particular concern has been the potential for transmission of infectious disease and organ and tissue injury, as well as the training and professional standards of acupuncture practitioners. This paper, therefore, addresses the following question: What is the frequency and severity of adverse complications and events in acupuncture treatment? Data Sources: All first-hand case reports of complications and adverse effects of acupuncture that could be identified in the English language literature were reviewed and classified according to type of complication or adverse effect, circumstances of the event, credentials of the acupuncturist, country of occurrence, and long-term patient outcome. Study Selection: The case reports were selected by a search of 9 databases and covered the years between 1965-1999. Data Extraction: Relevant papers were collected and analyzed by 2 reviewers. Over the 35 years, 202 incidents were identified in 98 relevant papers reported from 22 countries. Results: Types of complications included infections (primarily hepatitis from a few practitioners), and organ, tissue, and nerve injury. Adverse effects included cutaneous disorders, hypotension, fainting, and vomiting. There is a trend toward fewer reported serious complications after 1988. Conclusions: Declines in adverse reports may suggest that recent practices, such as clean needle techniques and more rigorous acupuncturist training requirements, have reduced the risks associated with the procedure. Therefore, acupuncture performed by trained practitioners using clean needle techniques is a generally safe procedure.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188547
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.329
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.497
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, GRen_US
dc.contributor.authorFu, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerman, BMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:13Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:13Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationAlternative Therapies In Health And Medicine, 2003, v. 9 n. 1, p. 72-83en_US
dc.identifier.issn1078-6791en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188547-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The greater acceptance of acupuncture by healthcare professionals and the public has increased the importance of addressing public concern about its safety. Of particular concern has been the potential for transmission of infectious disease and organ and tissue injury, as well as the training and professional standards of acupuncture practitioners. This paper, therefore, addresses the following question: What is the frequency and severity of adverse complications and events in acupuncture treatment? Data Sources: All first-hand case reports of complications and adverse effects of acupuncture that could be identified in the English language literature were reviewed and classified according to type of complication or adverse effect, circumstances of the event, credentials of the acupuncturist, country of occurrence, and long-term patient outcome. Study Selection: The case reports were selected by a search of 9 databases and covered the years between 1965-1999. Data Extraction: Relevant papers were collected and analyzed by 2 reviewers. Over the 35 years, 202 incidents were identified in 98 relevant papers reported from 22 countries. Results: Types of complications included infections (primarily hepatitis from a few practitioners), and organ, tissue, and nerve injury. Adverse effects included cutaneous disorders, hypotension, fainting, and vomiting. There is a trend toward fewer reported serious complications after 1988. Conclusions: Declines in adverse reports may suggest that recent practices, such as clean needle techniques and more rigorous acupuncturist training requirements, have reduced the risks associated with the procedure. Therefore, acupuncture performed by trained practitioners using clean needle techniques is a generally safe procedure.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInnoVision Communications. The Journal's web site is located at www.alternative-therapies.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAlternative Therapies in Health and Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapy - Adverse Effects - Standards - Trendsen_US
dc.subject.meshHepatitis - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHypotension - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNausea - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNeedlestick Injuries - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshPain - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfactionen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSkin Diseases - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSyncope - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVomiting - Etiologyen_US
dc.titleIs acupuncture safe? A systematic review of case reportsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid12564354-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037239159en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037239159&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage72en_US
dc.identifier.epage83en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000180472800015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHamilton, GR=8735376300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFu, J=8735376400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerman, BM=35458606800en_US

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