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Article: Acupuncture for low back pain.

TitleAcupuncture for low back pain.
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mrw.interscience.wiley.com/cochrane/cochrane_clsysrev_articles_fs.html
Citation
Cochrane Database Of Systematic Reviews (Online : Update Software), 2000 n. 2, p. CD001351 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Although low back pain is usually a self-limiting and benign disease that tends to improve spontaneously over time, a large variety of therapeutic interventions are available for the treatment of low back pain. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of acupuncture for the treatment of non-specific low back pain. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field trials register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (1997, issue 1), Medline (1966 - 1996), Embase (1988 - 1996), Science Citation Index and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of all types of acupuncture treatment that involves needling for subjects with non-specific low back pain. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers blinded with respect to authors, institution and journal independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. MAIN RESULTS: Eleven trials were included. The methodological quality was low. Only two trials were of high quality. Three trials compared acupuncture to no treatment, which were of low methodological quality and provide conflicting evidence. There was moderate evidence from two trials that acupuncture is not more effective than trigger point injection or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). There was limited evidence from eight trials that acupuncture is not more effective than placebo or sham acupuncture for the treatment of chronic low back pain. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: The evidence summarised in this systematic review does not indicate that acupuncture is effective for the treatment of back pain.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188535
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 6.035
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.366

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTulder Mwen_US
dc.contributor.authorCherkin, DCen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerman, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorKoes, BWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:09Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:09Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationCochrane Database Of Systematic Reviews (Online : Update Software), 2000 n. 2, p. CD001351en_US
dc.identifier.issn1469-493Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188535-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Although low back pain is usually a self-limiting and benign disease that tends to improve spontaneously over time, a large variety of therapeutic interventions are available for the treatment of low back pain. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to assess the effects of acupuncture for the treatment of non-specific low back pain. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field trials register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (1997, issue 1), Medline (1966 - 1996), Embase (1988 - 1996), Science Citation Index and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of all types of acupuncture treatment that involves needling for subjects with non-specific low back pain. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers blinded with respect to authors, institution and journal independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. MAIN RESULTS: Eleven trials were included. The methodological quality was low. Only two trials were of high quality. Three trials compared acupuncture to no treatment, which were of low methodological quality and provide conflicting evidence. There was moderate evidence from two trials that acupuncture is not more effective than trigger point injection or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). There was limited evidence from eight trials that acupuncture is not more effective than placebo or sham acupuncture for the treatment of chronic low back pain. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: The evidence summarised in this systematic review does not indicate that acupuncture is effective for the treatment of back pain.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mrw.interscience.wiley.com/cochrane/cochrane_clsysrev_articles_fs.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCochrane database of systematic reviews (Online : Update Software)en_US
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLow Back Pain - Therapyen_US
dc.titleAcupuncture for low back pain.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid10796434-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033661091en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spageCD001351en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTulder MW=7409508081en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCherkin, DC=7006291449en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerman, B=35458606800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKoes, BW=7006794878en_US

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