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Article: Physicians' attitudes toward complementary or alternative medicine: a regional survey.

TitlePhysicians' attitudes toward complementary or alternative medicine: a regional survey.
Authors
Issue Date1995
Citation
The Journal Of The American Board Of Family Practice / American Board Of Family Practice, 1995, v. 8 n. 5, p. 361-366 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: A survey exploring attitudes toward complementary or alternative medicine was distributed to 295 family physicians in the Chesapeake region. Physicians were asked about their knowledge, usage of, and training in complementary therapies and what evidence they expected of complementary medicine to aid in accepting these therapies. METHODS: Questionnaires were distributed at three separate conferences of family physicians with 180 physicians responding. RESULTS: More than 70 to 90 percent of the physicians considered complementary medical therapies, such as diet and exercise, behavioral medicine, counseling and psychotherapy, and hypnotherapy, to be legitimate medical practices. A majority had referred patients to nonphysicians for these therapies or used some of them in their own practices. Homeopathy, Native American medicine, and traditional Oriental medicine were not favored as legitimate medical practice. Areas where physicians had the least amount of training were most likely to be considered as alternative medicine by them. Seventy percent of responding physicians expressed interest in training in multiple areas of alternative medicine. Additionally, there was a strong positive correlation between evidentiary rules physicians believed should apply to orthodox medicine and to alternative or complementary medicine. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this survey show a high interest in alternative and complementary medicine by physicians. Some therapies are already being used by these physicians, and training is desired in most areas.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188528
ISSN
2005 Impact Factor: 1.636

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBerman, BMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSingh, BKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorSingh, BBen_US
dc.contributor.authorFerentz, KSen_US
dc.contributor.authorHartnoll, SMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:07Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:07Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal Of The American Board Of Family Practice / American Board Of Family Practice, 1995, v. 8 n. 5, p. 361-366en_US
dc.identifier.issn0893-8652en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188528-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: A survey exploring attitudes toward complementary or alternative medicine was distributed to 295 family physicians in the Chesapeake region. Physicians were asked about their knowledge, usage of, and training in complementary therapies and what evidence they expected of complementary medicine to aid in accepting these therapies. METHODS: Questionnaires were distributed at three separate conferences of family physicians with 180 physicians responding. RESULTS: More than 70 to 90 percent of the physicians considered complementary medical therapies, such as diet and exercise, behavioral medicine, counseling and psychotherapy, and hypnotherapy, to be legitimate medical practices. A majority had referred patients to nonphysicians for these therapies or used some of them in their own practices. Homeopathy, Native American medicine, and traditional Oriental medicine were not favored as legitimate medical practice. Areas where physicians had the least amount of training were most likely to be considered as alternative medicine by them. Seventy percent of responding physicians expressed interest in training in multiple areas of alternative medicine. Additionally, there was a strong positive correlation between evidentiary rules physicians believed should apply to orthodox medicine and to alternative or complementary medicine. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this survey show a high interest in alternative and complementary medicine by physicians. Some therapies are already being used by these physicians, and training is desired in most areas.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Journal of the American Board of Family Practice / American Board of Family Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude Of Health Personnelen_US
dc.subject.meshComplementary Therapiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFamily Practice - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPhysicians, Family - Education - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshReferral And Consultation - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.titlePhysicians' attitudes toward complementary or alternative medicine: a regional survey.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid7484223-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029377746en_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage361en_US
dc.identifier.epage366en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerman, BM=35458606800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSingh, BK=7405638582en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSingh, BB=7405639769en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFerentz, KS=6602389016en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHartnoll, SM=6603575467en_US

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