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Article: High-affinity L-aspartate transporter in prostate epithelial cells that is regulated by testosterone

TitleHigh-affinity L-aspartate transporter in prostate epithelial cells that is regulated by testosterone
Authors
Issue Date1993
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34304
Citation
Prostate, 1993, v. 22 n. 1, p. 53-63 How to Cite?
AbstractThe prostate gland produces and secretes extraordinarily high levels of citrate. Studies with rat ventral prostate (VP) have demonstrated that aspartate can serve as a four-carbon source of oxalacetate in the synthesis of citrate. To achieve this, prostate secretory epithelial cells must contain a transport system for the active uptake of aspartate from circulation. The present studies with VP epithelial cells confirm the existence of a Na +-dependent high affinity L-aspartate transporter. The transporter has an optimal pH ~ 7.5 and is temperature dependent. It appears to be an anionic amino acid transporter capable of transporting L-glutamate but not basic or neutral amino acids. The transporter is inhibited by ATPase inhibitors, thereby indicating its dependency on a Na + gradient. The characteristics of the high-affinity L-aspartate transporter are consistent with its operation at the basilar membrane for the transport of circulating aspartate into the cell. Castration (24 hr) resulted in a significant decrease in the ability of VP epithelial cells to transport L-aspartate. The administration of testosterone to castrated rats completely restored L-aspartate transport. In addition, in vitro testosterone addition (10 -8 M for 30 min) to isolated prostate epithelial cells markedly increased L-aspartate transport. Both cycloheximide and actinomycin inhibited the testosterone effect. The studies reveal that testosterone is a regulator of this Na +-dependent high-affinity L-aspartate transporter. The mechanism of this testosterone effect appears to involve both RNA and protein synthesis. We now have a model system to elucidate this novel effect of testosterone.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188524
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.778
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.477
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLao, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, RBen_US
dc.contributor.authorCostello, LCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:10:05Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:10:05Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationProstate, 1993, v. 22 n. 1, p. 53-63en_US
dc.identifier.issn0270-4137en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188524-
dc.description.abstractThe prostate gland produces and secretes extraordinarily high levels of citrate. Studies with rat ventral prostate (VP) have demonstrated that aspartate can serve as a four-carbon source of oxalacetate in the synthesis of citrate. To achieve this, prostate secretory epithelial cells must contain a transport system for the active uptake of aspartate from circulation. The present studies with VP epithelial cells confirm the existence of a Na +-dependent high affinity L-aspartate transporter. The transporter has an optimal pH ~ 7.5 and is temperature dependent. It appears to be an anionic amino acid transporter capable of transporting L-glutamate but not basic or neutral amino acids. The transporter is inhibited by ATPase inhibitors, thereby indicating its dependency on a Na + gradient. The characteristics of the high-affinity L-aspartate transporter are consistent with its operation at the basilar membrane for the transport of circulating aspartate into the cell. Castration (24 hr) resulted in a significant decrease in the ability of VP epithelial cells to transport L-aspartate. The administration of testosterone to castrated rats completely restored L-aspartate transport. In addition, in vitro testosterone addition (10 -8 M for 30 min) to isolated prostate epithelial cells markedly increased L-aspartate transport. Both cycloheximide and actinomycin inhibited the testosterone effect. The studies reveal that testosterone is a regulator of this Na +-dependent high-affinity L-aspartate transporter. The mechanism of this testosterone effect appears to involve both RNA and protein synthesis. We now have a model system to elucidate this novel effect of testosterone.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/34304en_US
dc.relation.ispartofProstateen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAspartic Acid - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Transport, Active - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultureden_US
dc.subject.meshEpithelium - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrogen-Ion Concentrationen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshProstate - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Wistaren_US
dc.subject.meshSodium - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshTemperatureen_US
dc.subject.meshTestosterone - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.titleHigh-affinity L-aspartate transporter in prostate epithelial cells that is regulated by testosteroneen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pros.2990220108-
dc.identifier.pmid8426838en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027535976en_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage53en_US
dc.identifier.epage63en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1993KJ89300007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLao, L=7005681883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFranklin, RB=7201428474en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCostello, LC=24592383900en_US

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