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Article: Violence and the end of revolution after 1989

TitleViolence and the end of revolution after 1989
Authors
KeywordsHannah Arendt
Jan Patoc̈ka
Power
Revolution
Václav Havel
Violence
Issue Date2009
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105796
Citation
Thesis Eleven, 2009, v. 97 n. 1, p. 6-25 How to Cite?
AbstractThe series of Velvet revolutions in 1989, which brought about the collapse of communism in Europe, seem to have vindicated those political theorists and activists who believed in the possibility of non-violent power. The relative success of the 1989 revolutions has validated a new paradigm of revolutionary change based on the assumption that radical changes were attainable through moderate means. Yet the legacy of these non-violent revolutions also points towards the limits of political strategies fundamentally opposed to violence. The article shows that the key architects of non-violent revolutions in 1989 were well aware of the contingent nature of all political actions, and were thus willing to take risks in their pursuit of freedom.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188339
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.158
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAuer, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-03T04:02:20Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-03T04:02:20Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationThesis Eleven, 2009, v. 97 n. 1, p. 6-25en_US
dc.identifier.issn0725-5136en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188339-
dc.description.abstractThe series of Velvet revolutions in 1989, which brought about the collapse of communism in Europe, seem to have vindicated those political theorists and activists who believed in the possibility of non-violent power. The relative success of the 1989 revolutions has validated a new paradigm of revolutionary change based on the assumption that radical changes were attainable through moderate means. Yet the legacy of these non-violent revolutions also points towards the limits of political strategies fundamentally opposed to violence. The article shows that the key architects of non-violent revolutions in 1989 were well aware of the contingent nature of all political actions, and were thus willing to take risks in their pursuit of freedom.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105796en_US
dc.relation.ispartofThesis Elevenen_US
dc.subjectHannah Arendten_US
dc.subjectJan Patoc̈kaen_US
dc.subjectPoweren_US
dc.subjectRevolutionen_US
dc.subjectVáclav Havelen_US
dc.subjectViolenceen_US
dc.titleViolence and the end of revolution after 1989en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailAuer, S: stefauer@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityAuer, S=rp01793en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0725513608101906en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68349133780en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-68349133780&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume97en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage6en_US
dc.identifier.epage25en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAuer, S=24075346900en_US

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