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Conference Paper: Strategies to promote children's school based physical activity: Transform-US! Mid-intervention findings

TitleStrategies to promote children's school based physical activity: Transform-US! Mid-intervention findings
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Australia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/707423/description?navopenmenu=-2
Citation
The 4th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health (Be Active 2012), Sydney, NSW., Australia, 31 October-3 November 2012. In Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2012, v. 15 suppl. 1, p. S114-S115 How to Cite?
AbstractMany children engage in suboptimal levels of PA despite the associated health risks. Schools (n=20) in the Transform-Us! program were randomized to one of four intervention arms that target increases in children’s PA (PA), reductions in sedentary behavior (SB), both behaviors (SB+PA) or control current practice (C). This examination focuses on the PA promotion strategies employed in the PA and SB+PA arms compared with the C arm. To promote children’s PA each PA and SB+PA class was provided with sporting and circus equipment; asphalt line markings were installed at the school; and teachers were asked to encourage PA. Grade 3 children at participating schools were invited to take part in evaluation assessments including the completion of a self-report survey. Findings from the PA promotion strategy questions at baseline (Feb–June 2010), and T2 (Nov/Dec) are reported here. Children (n=425, 55% female) were asked to respond (yes/no) to five items asking about social support for PA from their class teacher, which were then summed to create a ‘teacher social support’ scale. Children were also asked to indicate if ‘there are markings on the walls or on the school playground to help us play games’ (perceived availability of line markings); if they are ‘allowed to use school sports equipment during recess and lunch breaks’ (perceived accessibility of sports equipment); and how much they like ‘the areas to play in at school’ using a 5-point Likert scale (perceived school environment). Between baseline and T2, teacher social support increased in both PA (1.7[1.4] vs 2.1[1.4]) and SB arms (1.9[1.4] vs 2.4[1.4) but declined in C (2.0[1.4] vs 1.7[1.5]). For all three arms, increases were seen in perceived availability of line markings (PA: 53.2% vs 69.4%; SB+PA: 59.3% vs 71.4%; C: 60.0% vs 69.8%); perceived accessibility of sport equipment (PA: 87.7% vs 97.2%: SB+PA: 80.7 vs 94%; C: 85.4% vs 97.6%); and perceived school environment (PA: 1.44[0.9] vs 1.42[0.8]; SB+PA: 1.5[0.8] vs 1.6[0.7]; C: 1.4[0.9] vs 1.5[0.7]) between baseline and T2. All findings were significant at a 1% probability level. At the mid-intervention time point, findings suggest that PA strategies have increased perceived availability of line markings, accessibility of sport equipment, and perceived school environment in children allocated to the PA and SB+PA arms. However, there were also unexpected increases in the C arm for three out of four items. Post-intervention findings will add to these preliminary findings.
DescriptionSession 202 - School based interventions: paper 276
This journal suppl. entitled: Be Avtive 2012
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188037
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.756
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.484

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorArundell, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorSalmon, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorYildrim, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorHesketh, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorBall, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorChin A Paw, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorHume, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-21T07:26:47Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-21T07:26:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 4th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health (Be Active 2012), Sydney, NSW., Australia, 31 October-3 November 2012. In Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2012, v. 15 suppl. 1, p. S114-S115en_US
dc.identifier.issn1440-2440-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/188037-
dc.descriptionSession 202 - School based interventions: paper 276-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: Be Avtive 2012-
dc.description.abstractMany children engage in suboptimal levels of PA despite the associated health risks. Schools (n=20) in the Transform-Us! program were randomized to one of four intervention arms that target increases in children’s PA (PA), reductions in sedentary behavior (SB), both behaviors (SB+PA) or control current practice (C). This examination focuses on the PA promotion strategies employed in the PA and SB+PA arms compared with the C arm. To promote children’s PA each PA and SB+PA class was provided with sporting and circus equipment; asphalt line markings were installed at the school; and teachers were asked to encourage PA. Grade 3 children at participating schools were invited to take part in evaluation assessments including the completion of a self-report survey. Findings from the PA promotion strategy questions at baseline (Feb–June 2010), and T2 (Nov/Dec) are reported here. Children (n=425, 55% female) were asked to respond (yes/no) to five items asking about social support for PA from their class teacher, which were then summed to create a ‘teacher social support’ scale. Children were also asked to indicate if ‘there are markings on the walls or on the school playground to help us play games’ (perceived availability of line markings); if they are ‘allowed to use school sports equipment during recess and lunch breaks’ (perceived accessibility of sports equipment); and how much they like ‘the areas to play in at school’ using a 5-point Likert scale (perceived school environment). Between baseline and T2, teacher social support increased in both PA (1.7[1.4] vs 2.1[1.4]) and SB arms (1.9[1.4] vs 2.4[1.4) but declined in C (2.0[1.4] vs 1.7[1.5]). For all three arms, increases were seen in perceived availability of line markings (PA: 53.2% vs 69.4%; SB+PA: 59.3% vs 71.4%; C: 60.0% vs 69.8%); perceived accessibility of sport equipment (PA: 87.7% vs 97.2%: SB+PA: 80.7 vs 94%; C: 85.4% vs 97.6%); and perceived school environment (PA: 1.44[0.9] vs 1.42[0.8]; SB+PA: 1.5[0.8] vs 1.6[0.7]; C: 1.4[0.9] vs 1.5[0.7]) between baseline and T2. All findings were significant at a 1% probability level. At the mid-intervention time point, findings suggest that PA strategies have increased perceived availability of line markings, accessibility of sport equipment, and perceived school environment in children allocated to the PA and SB+PA arms. However, there were also unexpected increases in the C arm for three out of four items. Post-intervention findings will add to these preliminary findings.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Australia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/707423/description?navopenmenu=-2-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Science and Medicine in Sporten_US
dc.titleStrategies to promote children's school based physical activity: Transform-US! Mid-intervention findingsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros218468en_US
dc.identifier.volume15-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS114-
dc.identifier.epageS115-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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