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Article: When grapevine news meets mass media: Different information sources and popular perceptions of government corruption in Mainland China

TitleWhen grapevine news meets mass media: Different information sources and popular perceptions of government corruption in Mainland China
Authors
KeywordsCorruption
Perception
Media
Grapevine
China
Issue Date2013
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=84
Citation
Comparative Political Studies, 2013, v. 46 n. 8, p. 920-946 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper examines factors that shape people’s perceptions of government corruption in China. We are particularly interested in how people acquire information on local corruption, given the general lack of pertinent first-hand experience. We combine the data from a national survey in Mainland China with a self-compiled dataset on the number of corruption cases reported in Chinese provincial newspapers. The results of Probit and Heckman Selection models show that indirect formal and indirect informal information sources have diverging effects. While coverage of corruption by newspapers controlled by the authoritarian regime reduces people’s perceptions of corruption, exposure to grapevine news significantly increases perceived corruption. Moreover, access to media controlled by the government can significantly dilute the negative impact of grapevine news on perceptions of corruption.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187824
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.214
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.770
SSRN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorShi, Ten_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-21T07:15:38Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-21T07:15:38Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationComparative Political Studies, 2013, v. 46 n. 8, p. 920-946en_US
dc.identifier.issn0010-4140-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187824-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines factors that shape people’s perceptions of government corruption in China. We are particularly interested in how people acquire information on local corruption, given the general lack of pertinent first-hand experience. We combine the data from a national survey in Mainland China with a self-compiled dataset on the number of corruption cases reported in Chinese provincial newspapers. The results of Probit and Heckman Selection models show that indirect formal and indirect informal information sources have diverging effects. While coverage of corruption by newspapers controlled by the authoritarian regime reduces people’s perceptions of corruption, exposure to grapevine news significantly increases perceived corruption. Moreover, access to media controlled by the government can significantly dilute the negative impact of grapevine news on perceptions of corruption.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=84en_US
dc.relation.ispartofComparative Political Studiesen_US
dc.rightsComparative Political Studies. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCorruption-
dc.subjectPerception-
dc.subjectMedia-
dc.subjectGrapevine-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.titleWhen grapevine news meets mass media: Different information sources and popular perceptions of government corruption in Mainland Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhu, J: zhujn@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhu, J=rp01624en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0010414012463886-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84876565478-
dc.identifier.hkuros219599en_US
dc.identifier.volume46en_US
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage920en_US
dc.identifier.epage946en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000321491500002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.ssrn1981023-

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