File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Book Chapter: Emerging Nanomedicine for Skin Cancer

TitleEmerging Nanomedicine for Skin Cancer
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Emerging Nanomedicine for Skin Cancer. In Nasir, A., Friedman, A & Wang, S (Eds.), Nanotechnology in Dermatology, p. 119-125. New York: Springer, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractSkin cancer is a common cancer and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Topical treatment is an attractive option compared with systemic route due to the reduced association with systemic toxicity. Nonetheless, skin is a natural barrier under physiological conditions for topical drug delivery as it is crucial to provide protection to the body. Such barrier will limit the drug uptake into skin. Common strategies consisting of physical and chemical approaches to overcome this have been reported to improve topical delivery efficacy. However, safety concerns caused by possible irreversible skin damage remain. Due to the heterogeneous physical and chemical property of the skin, current methods limits the variety of drugs suitable for effective delivery into skin. Here, in this review, we showed the promise in engineering lipidic nanoparticles in treating skin cancer.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187480
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, PYen_US
dc.contributor.authorNasir, A-
dc.contributor.authorWong, KKY-
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:50:33Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:50:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationEmerging Nanomedicine for Skin Cancer. In Nasir, A., Friedman, A & Wang, S (Eds.), Nanotechnology in Dermatology, p. 119-125. New York: Springer, 2013en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781461450337-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187480-
dc.description.abstractSkin cancer is a common cancer and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Topical treatment is an attractive option compared with systemic route due to the reduced association with systemic toxicity. Nonetheless, skin is a natural barrier under physiological conditions for topical drug delivery as it is crucial to provide protection to the body. Such barrier will limit the drug uptake into skin. Common strategies consisting of physical and chemical approaches to overcome this have been reported to improve topical delivery efficacy. However, safety concerns caused by possible irreversible skin damage remain. Due to the heterogeneous physical and chemical property of the skin, current methods limits the variety of drugs suitable for effective delivery into skin. Here, in this review, we showed the promise in engineering lipidic nanoparticles in treating skin cancer.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.relation.ispartofNanotechnology in Dermatologyen_US
dc.titleEmerging Nanomedicine for Skin Canceren_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, PY: puiyanle@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, KKY: kkywong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, KKY=rp01392en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4614-5034-4_11-
dc.identifier.hkuros220239en_US
dc.identifier.spage119-
dc.identifier.epage125-
dc.publisher.placeNew York-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats