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Book Chapter: Application of nanomedicine in wound healing

TitleApplication of nanomedicine in wound healing
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Application of nanomedicine in wound healing. In Nasir, A., Friedman, A & Wang, S (Eds.), Nanotechnology in Dermatology, p. 221-229. New York: Springer, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractEmergence of new materials and technology and their broad application is invariably identified as the symbol of scientific progress in any era. With recent advancement and development of nanotechnology, it has been made possible to engineer many kinds of materials into various shapes and sizes at the nanometer level. The sizes of these nanoparticles usually vary from 1 nm to 100 nm, which is much smaller than the generally targeted cells in the organism (Fig. 21.1), and will exhibit remarkably differential and amazing biological activities due to their unusual physical and chemical properties due to enhanced surface area to volume ratio for a given mass [1, 2]. This means that nano-sized particles are more likely to have increased cell surface interactions and to gain access into internal cell environments, resulting in significant biomedical effect or efficacy. In recent years, burgeoning interest in the medical applications of nanotechnology has led to the emergence of a new scientific field—Nanomedicine [3–8]. Nanomedicine, as the most important cross-link subject between nanoscience and biomedicine, is defined as the process of disease prevention, diagnosis, and therapeutic using nanomaterials or nanotechnology [9, 10].
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187479
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, KKY-
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:50:33Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:50:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationApplication of nanomedicine in wound healing. In Nasir, A., Friedman, A & Wang, S (Eds.), Nanotechnology in Dermatology, p. 221-229. New York: Springer, 2013en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781461450337-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187479-
dc.description.abstractEmergence of new materials and technology and their broad application is invariably identified as the symbol of scientific progress in any era. With recent advancement and development of nanotechnology, it has been made possible to engineer many kinds of materials into various shapes and sizes at the nanometer level. The sizes of these nanoparticles usually vary from 1 nm to 100 nm, which is much smaller than the generally targeted cells in the organism (Fig. 21.1), and will exhibit remarkably differential and amazing biological activities due to their unusual physical and chemical properties due to enhanced surface area to volume ratio for a given mass [1, 2]. This means that nano-sized particles are more likely to have increased cell surface interactions and to gain access into internal cell environments, resulting in significant biomedical effect or efficacy. In recent years, burgeoning interest in the medical applications of nanotechnology has led to the emergence of a new scientific field—Nanomedicine [3–8]. Nanomedicine, as the most important cross-link subject between nanoscience and biomedicine, is defined as the process of disease prevention, diagnosis, and therapeutic using nanomaterials or nanotechnology [9, 10].-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.relation.ispartofNanotechnology in Dermatologyen_US
dc.titleApplication of nanomedicine in wound healingen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailLiu, X: liuxl@HKUCC.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, KKY: kkywong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, KKY=rp01392en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4614-5034-4_21-
dc.identifier.hkuros220238en_US
dc.identifier.spage221-
dc.identifier.epage229-
dc.publisher.placeNew York-

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