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Conference Paper: Reducing burnout for end-of-life care workers: Art Therapy based supervision hospice: art in supervision

TitleReducing burnout for end-of-life care workers: Art Therapy based supervision hospice: art in supervision
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
The 44th Annual Conference of the American Art Therapy Association (AATA 2013), Seattle, WA., 26-30 June 2013. How to Cite?
AbstractCare of the dying and the bereaved can be a psychological, emotional, and spiritual burden to professional caregivers that can lead to compassion fatigue or burnout (Swetz, Harrington, Matsuyama, Shanafelt & Lyckholm, 2009). One way to prevent burnout is through the intentional offering of supervision that emphasizes awareness of and attention to emotional responses to work while promoting autonomy, support and meaning-making (Pereira, Fonseca, & Carvalho, 2011), especially when compared to supervision that solely focuses on knowledge acquisition and clinical skills (Sardiwalla, VandenBerg & Esterhuyse, 2007). Including art making in supervision allows for increased emotional reflection (Franklin, 1999). Studies with end-of-life care workers have proven its benefits in reducing burnout …
DescriptionTheme: Art Therapy: Connecting Visual Expression & Healing
The Conference proceedings' website is located at http://www.xcdsystem.com/aata2013/proceedings/prof133.html
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187370

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPotash, JSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:39:00Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:39:00Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 44th Annual Conference of the American Art Therapy Association (AATA 2013), Seattle, WA., 26-30 June 2013.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187370-
dc.descriptionTheme: Art Therapy: Connecting Visual Expression & Healing-
dc.descriptionThe Conference proceedings' website is located at http://www.xcdsystem.com/aata2013/proceedings/prof133.html-
dc.description.abstractCare of the dying and the bereaved can be a psychological, emotional, and spiritual burden to professional caregivers that can lead to compassion fatigue or burnout (Swetz, Harrington, Matsuyama, Shanafelt & Lyckholm, 2009). One way to prevent burnout is through the intentional offering of supervision that emphasizes awareness of and attention to emotional responses to work while promoting autonomy, support and meaning-making (Pereira, Fonseca, & Carvalho, 2011), especially when compared to supervision that solely focuses on knowledge acquisition and clinical skills (Sardiwalla, VandenBerg & Esterhuyse, 2007). Including art making in supervision allows for increased emotional reflection (Franklin, 1999). Studies with end-of-life care workers have proven its benefits in reducing burnout …-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartof44th AATA Annual Conference 2013en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleReducing burnout for end-of-life care workers: Art Therapy based supervision hospice: art in supervisionen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailPotash, JS: jspotash@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros219214en_US

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