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Conference Paper: What cognitive-linguistic skills are important to text writing in Chinese?

TitleWhat cognitive-linguistic skills are important to text writing in Chinese?
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe Society for the Scientific Study of Reading.
Citation
The 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading (SSSR 2012) held in conjunction with the Society for Text and Discourse 2012 Conference, Montreal, Canada, 11-14 July 2012. How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose The present study aimed to investigate what types of cognitive-linguistic skills are important to Chinese text writing among elementary grade children. Method Two hundred fifty-nine Grade 4 students (133 boys and 126 girls) from two representative elementary schools in Hong Kong were administered measures tapping text writing skills and cognitive-linguistic skills (verbal working memory, transcription skills, oral narrative skills, syntactic skills and discourse skills) that were significant predictors of text writing. Results Hierarchical multiple regression analyses results suggested that transcription skills and syntactic skills contributed unique variance to text writing after controlling for age, IQ and verbal working memory. However, oral narrative skills and discourse skills were not significant predictors of text writing. Path analyses results showed that only transcription skills and syntactic skills had direct effects on text writing. Conclusions These findings among Chinese children were contrary to those among children learning to write in transparent writing systems (e.g., Turkish, Finnish) (Babayiğit & Stainthorp, 2010, 2011; Mäki, Voeten, Vauras, & Poskiparta, 2001) where working memory and oral language skills were significant predictors of text writing, but not transcriptions skills (i.e., handwriting or spelling), starting in grade 2. The strong contribution of transcription skills to Chinese text writing among children beyond the early elementary grades may reflect the complexity of the Chinese writing system. In view of these differences in the cognitive-linguistic skills important to text writing across different orthographies, orthographic depth may need to be considered in developing a universal model of text writing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187096

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, PSen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, CSHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, DWOen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, KKHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:28:50Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:28:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading (SSSR 2012) held in conjunction with the Society for Text and Discourse 2012 Conference, Montreal, Canada, 11-14 July 2012.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187096-
dc.description.abstractPurpose The present study aimed to investigate what types of cognitive-linguistic skills are important to Chinese text writing among elementary grade children. Method Two hundred fifty-nine Grade 4 students (133 boys and 126 girls) from two representative elementary schools in Hong Kong were administered measures tapping text writing skills and cognitive-linguistic skills (verbal working memory, transcription skills, oral narrative skills, syntactic skills and discourse skills) that were significant predictors of text writing. Results Hierarchical multiple regression analyses results suggested that transcription skills and syntactic skills contributed unique variance to text writing after controlling for age, IQ and verbal working memory. However, oral narrative skills and discourse skills were not significant predictors of text writing. Path analyses results showed that only transcription skills and syntactic skills had direct effects on text writing. Conclusions These findings among Chinese children were contrary to those among children learning to write in transparent writing systems (e.g., Turkish, Finnish) (Babayiğit & Stainthorp, 2010, 2011; Mäki, Voeten, Vauras, & Poskiparta, 2001) where working memory and oral language skills were significant predictors of text writing, but not transcriptions skills (i.e., handwriting or spelling), starting in grade 2. The strong contribution of transcription skills to Chinese text writing among children beyond the early elementary grades may reflect the complexity of the Chinese writing system. In view of these differences in the cognitive-linguistic skills important to text writing across different orthographies, orthographic depth may need to be considered in developing a universal model of text writing.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Society for the Scientific Study of Reading.-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading, SSSR 2012en_US
dc.titleWhat cognitive-linguistic skills are important to text writing in Chinese?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailYeung, PS: patcyy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, CSH: shhoc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, PS=rp00641en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, CSH=rp00631en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros201067en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros215284-
dc.identifier.hkuros220754-

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