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Conference Paper: Patient safety culture among medical students in Singapore and Hong Kong

TitlePatient safety culture among medical students in Singapore and Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsPatient safety
Curriculum
Medical students
Attitudes
Issue Date2013
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110
Citation
The 10th Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC 2013), Singapore, 16-20 January 2013. In Medical Education, 2013, v. 47 suppl. s2, p. 14, abstract no. 43 How to Cite?
AbstractUndergraduate education plays an important role in promoting patient safety. Students from different backgrounds may differ in their perceptions towards patient safety. We investigated whether and how patient safety cultures may differ between students from different countries. We used a validated instrument, the ‘Attitudes to Patient Safety Questionnaire (APSQ)-III’, to study two cohorts of second-year medical students from Singapore (SG) and Hong Kong (HK). None had received any previous teaching on patient safety. The APSQ-III consisted of 26 items covering nine key patient safety factors. The responders included 81 (31.3%) students from HK and 178 (68.7%) from SG. The overall response rate was 66.4%. Significant differences were found in two key factors – students from HK were more likely to report having more patient safety training (P = 0.007) whereas SG students reported less confidence in error disclosure (P < 0.001). Both groups considered medical error as inevitable, and that long working hours and professional incompetence were important causes of medical errors. The importance of patient involvement and team functioning received relatively less emphasis. In summary, The APSQ-III could identify differences in patient safety cultures and possibly teaching needs amongst students from different medical schools. Students with no prior teaching on the subject may differ in their self-efficacy possibly due to underlying differences between their local cultures and healthcare environments. Patient safety teaching should be tailored to students’ perceptions and needs, and longitudinally studies using a validated instrument may help to design and evaluate teaching programs.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. is Special Issue: Abstracts of the 10th Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187031
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.369
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.913
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GKKen_US
dc.contributor.authorAng, SBLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, TCen_US
dc.contributor.authorNeo, HKen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatil, NGen_US
dc.contributor.authorTi, LKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:26:43Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:26:43Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 10th Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC 2013), Singapore, 16-20 January 2013. In Medical Education, 2013, v. 47 suppl. s2, p. 14, abstract no. 43en_US
dc.identifier.issn0308-0110-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187031-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. is Special Issue: Abstracts of the 10th Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC)-
dc.description.abstractUndergraduate education plays an important role in promoting patient safety. Students from different backgrounds may differ in their perceptions towards patient safety. We investigated whether and how patient safety cultures may differ between students from different countries. We used a validated instrument, the ‘Attitudes to Patient Safety Questionnaire (APSQ)-III’, to study two cohorts of second-year medical students from Singapore (SG) and Hong Kong (HK). None had received any previous teaching on patient safety. The APSQ-III consisted of 26 items covering nine key patient safety factors. The responders included 81 (31.3%) students from HK and 178 (68.7%) from SG. The overall response rate was 66.4%. Significant differences were found in two key factors – students from HK were more likely to report having more patient safety training (P = 0.007) whereas SG students reported less confidence in error disclosure (P < 0.001). Both groups considered medical error as inevitable, and that long working hours and professional incompetence were important causes of medical errors. The importance of patient involvement and team functioning received relatively less emphasis. In summary, The APSQ-III could identify differences in patient safety cultures and possibly teaching needs amongst students from different medical schools. Students with no prior teaching on the subject may differ in their self-efficacy possibly due to underlying differences between their local cultures and healthcare environments. Patient safety teaching should be tailored to students’ perceptions and needs, and longitudinally studies using a validated instrument may help to design and evaluate teaching programs.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110-
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Educationen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectPatient safety-
dc.subjectCurriculum-
dc.subjectMedical students-
dc.subjectAttitudes-
dc.titlePatient safety culture among medical students in Singapore and Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GKK: gilberto@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPatil, NG: ngpatil@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GKK=rp00522en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/medu.12294-
dc.identifier.hkuros218892en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros219786-
dc.identifier.volume47-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. s2-
dc.identifier.spage14-
dc.identifier.epage14-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000323649000002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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