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Conference Paper: Food security and the commons in ASEAN: the role of Singapore

TitleFood security and the commons in ASEAN: the role of Singapore
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherICIRD.
Citation
The 3rd International Conference on International Relations and Development (ICIRD 2013), Bangkok, Thailand, 22-23 August 2013., p. 1-13 How to Cite?
AbstractSince the conception of the ASEAN Integrated Food Security (AIFS) Framework in 2008, ASEAN member states have taken steps to implement the components and strategic thrusts laid out in the AIFS Framework. These actions can be seen as contributing to the development of a regional “commons” which is based on prioritizing the right of “all people, at all times, [to] have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life” (FAO 1996). Although a wide range of conditions exist with regard to this right across the ASEAN member states, as a net-food importing country which imports 90% of its food from a limited number of sources, in this paper Singapore is presented as a case study for the increasing importance of taking a commons perspective on food supply and security. The paper is particularly concerned with actions to diversify food sources, increase local food production and promote food and agro-based industry, research, and development. In the context of a highly urbanized population with limited land and natural resources, the paper argues that those seeming disadvantages can serve to benefit both the local and wider community. Initially part of a design research project to discover, document, and test potential strategies to address Hong Kong’s situation as a net-food importing territory which relies on a limited number of sources -95% of its food is imported and 60% of that comes from Mainland China - this paper traces the recent history of food security policies and actions in Singapore with respect to increasing local production. The paper examines several case studies that demonstrate the application of the AIFS framework, in particular the development of research, technology and community resources for urban agricultural production. The paper concludes with a reflection on Singapore’s role in providing for a food secure future for itself, and by extension, the entire region.
DescriptionConference Theme: Beyond Borders: Building a Regional Commons in Southeast Asia
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186605

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCate Christ, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:15:05Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:15:05Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationThe 3rd International Conference on International Relations and Development (ICIRD 2013), Bangkok, Thailand, 22-23 August 2013., p. 1-13en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186605-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Beyond Borders: Building a Regional Commons in Southeast Asia-
dc.description.abstractSince the conception of the ASEAN Integrated Food Security (AIFS) Framework in 2008, ASEAN member states have taken steps to implement the components and strategic thrusts laid out in the AIFS Framework. These actions can be seen as contributing to the development of a regional “commons” which is based on prioritizing the right of “all people, at all times, [to] have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life” (FAO 1996). Although a wide range of conditions exist with regard to this right across the ASEAN member states, as a net-food importing country which imports 90% of its food from a limited number of sources, in this paper Singapore is presented as a case study for the increasing importance of taking a commons perspective on food supply and security. The paper is particularly concerned with actions to diversify food sources, increase local food production and promote food and agro-based industry, research, and development. In the context of a highly urbanized population with limited land and natural resources, the paper argues that those seeming disadvantages can serve to benefit both the local and wider community. Initially part of a design research project to discover, document, and test potential strategies to address Hong Kong’s situation as a net-food importing territory which relies on a limited number of sources -95% of its food is imported and 60% of that comes from Mainland China - this paper traces the recent history of food security policies and actions in Singapore with respect to increasing local production. The paper examines several case studies that demonstrate the application of the AIFS framework, in particular the development of research, technology and community resources for urban agricultural production. The paper concludes with a reflection on Singapore’s role in providing for a food secure future for itself, and by extension, the entire region.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherICIRD.-
dc.relation.ispartof3rd ICIRD International Conference 2013en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleFood security and the commons in ASEAN: the role of Singaporeen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailCate Christ, M: mcchrist@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCate Christ, M=rp01505en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros218434en_US
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage13-

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