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Article: Extended lymphadenectomy in esophageal cancer is crucial

TitleExtended lymphadenectomy in esophageal cancer is crucial
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
World Journal of Surgery, 2013, v. 37 n. 8, p. 1751-1756 How to Cite?
AbstractSurgery with lymphadenectomy remains the mainstay of treatment for esophageal cancer. The optimal extent of nodal dissection is controversial. Evidence is accumulating, however, that could demonstrate the benefits of extended lymphadenectomy, which include more accurate disease staging, better locoregional disease control, and improved survival. Except in very early disease where nodal metastases are rare, extended lymphadenectomy is indicated. Data from a randomized controlled trial comparing transhiatal and transthoracic resection have shown better survival in patients with limited nodal burden. Other investigations on en bloc resection, three-field lymphadenectomy, and large-scale international collaborative studies have all provided evidence for the more extensive approach to enhance cure for esophageal cancer. The more extended surgery does lead to potentially higher morbidity rates, and thus surgeons should be versatile in applying such techniques in carefully selected patients, so that postoperative survival and quality of life of patients are not compromised. The challenge in the future is how to tailor surgical strategies for individual patients in order to achieve the best outcome. © 2013 Société Internationale de Chirurgie.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186370
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.523
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.375
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTong, DKHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaw, SYKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:03:56Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:03:56Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationWorld Journal of Surgery, 2013, v. 37 n. 8, p. 1751-1756en_US
dc.identifier.issn0364-2313-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186370-
dc.description.abstractSurgery with lymphadenectomy remains the mainstay of treatment for esophageal cancer. The optimal extent of nodal dissection is controversial. Evidence is accumulating, however, that could demonstrate the benefits of extended lymphadenectomy, which include more accurate disease staging, better locoregional disease control, and improved survival. Except in very early disease where nodal metastases are rare, extended lymphadenectomy is indicated. Data from a randomized controlled trial comparing transhiatal and transthoracic resection have shown better survival in patients with limited nodal burden. Other investigations on en bloc resection, three-field lymphadenectomy, and large-scale international collaborative studies have all provided evidence for the more extensive approach to enhance cure for esophageal cancer. The more extended surgery does lead to potentially higher morbidity rates, and thus surgeons should be versatile in applying such techniques in carefully selected patients, so that postoperative survival and quality of life of patients are not compromised. The challenge in the future is how to tailor surgical strategies for individual patients in order to achieve the best outcome. © 2013 Société Internationale de Chirurgie.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofWorld Journal of Surgeryen_US
dc.titleExtended lymphadenectomy in esophageal cancer is crucialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTong, DKH: esodtong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLaw, SYK: slaw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, SYK=rp00437en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00268-013-2068-8-
dc.identifier.pmid23625012-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84880763985-
dc.identifier.hkuros220282en_US
dc.identifier.volume37en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage1751en_US
dc.identifier.epage1756en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000322023600002-

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