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Article: Managing dental fear and anxiety in pediatric patients: A qualitative study from the public’s perspective

TitleManaging dental fear and anxiety in pediatric patients: A qualitative study from the public’s perspective
Authors
KeywordsDental anxiety
Qualitative research
Pediatric dentistry
Issue Date2014
PublisherAmerican Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aapd.org/publications/peddent/
Citation
Pediatric Dentistry, 2014, v. 36 n. 1, p. 29-33 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Internet social media offers a rich source for soliciting the public's views on health issues. This qualitative research, using You-Tube as a platform, aimed to explore the public's perspectives on management of dental fear and anxiety (DFA) in pediatric patients. Methods: Using three keywords (“dental fear,” “dental phobia,” and “dental anxiety”), YouTube videos were searched. Twenty-seven videos related to DFA in children and adolescents were reviewed by three investigators, including a nondental layperson. Inductive thematic analysis was adopted for interpreting the data. Results: Several strategies were considered useful for controlling DFA in pediatric patients, including: verbal and nonverbal communication to establish closeness and effective guidance (explanation, permission-seeking, reassurance, and negotiation); desensitization to dental settings and procedures; tell-show-do; positive reinforcement; distraction by imagination and thoughtful designs of clinic; and parental presence and support. Some self-coping strategies adopted by patients alleviated their DFA, such as self-reasoning and trust-building through long-term connection. Dentists' clinical competence, favorable treatment outcomes, and state-of-the-art devices and technologies (dental lasers, intraoral camera, and adapted anaesthesia method) contributed to reducing DFA. Conclusions: Authentic testimonials in YouTube videos endorsed and interpreted a variety of strategies adoptable by patients, parents, and dental professionals for managing children's and adolescents' dental fears and anxieties.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185588
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.872
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.458
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHamzah, HSen_US
dc.contributor.authorGao, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, CKYen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, NMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T11:32:33Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T11:32:33Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Dentistry, 2014, v. 36 n. 1, p. 29-33en_US
dc.identifier.issn0164-1263-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185588-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Internet social media offers a rich source for soliciting the public's views on health issues. This qualitative research, using You-Tube as a platform, aimed to explore the public's perspectives on management of dental fear and anxiety (DFA) in pediatric patients. Methods: Using three keywords (“dental fear,” “dental phobia,” and “dental anxiety”), YouTube videos were searched. Twenty-seven videos related to DFA in children and adolescents were reviewed by three investigators, including a nondental layperson. Inductive thematic analysis was adopted for interpreting the data. Results: Several strategies were considered useful for controlling DFA in pediatric patients, including: verbal and nonverbal communication to establish closeness and effective guidance (explanation, permission-seeking, reassurance, and negotiation); desensitization to dental settings and procedures; tell-show-do; positive reinforcement; distraction by imagination and thoughtful designs of clinic; and parental presence and support. Some self-coping strategies adopted by patients alleviated their DFA, such as self-reasoning and trust-building through long-term connection. Dentists' clinical competence, favorable treatment outcomes, and state-of-the-art devices and technologies (dental lasers, intraoral camera, and adapted anaesthesia method) contributed to reducing DFA. Conclusions: Authentic testimonials in YouTube videos endorsed and interpreted a variety of strategies adoptable by patients, parents, and dental professionals for managing children's and adolescents' dental fears and anxieties.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aapd.org/publications/peddent/-
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Dentistryen_US
dc.subjectDental anxiety-
dc.subjectQualitative research-
dc.subjectPediatric dentistry-
dc.titleManaging dental fear and anxiety in pediatric patients: A qualitative study from the public’s perspectiveen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGao, X: gaoxl@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, CKY: ckyyiu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGao, X=rp01509en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, CKY=rp00018en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, CPJ=rp00037en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24717706-
dc.identifier.hkuros219095en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros233792-
dc.identifier.volume36-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage29-
dc.identifier.epage33-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000342336400005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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