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Article: Trade finance in East Asia - potential responses to the shortfall

TitleTrade finance in East Asia - potential responses to the shortfall
Authors
KeywordsBanking and Finance
Commercial Law
Comparative and Foreign Law
International Trade
Law
Issue Date2013
PublisherUniversity of New South Wales Faculty of Law.
Citation
University of New South Wales Faculty of Law Research Series, 2013, p. Working Paper 43 How to Cite?
AbstractThe crisis of 2008 saw many European banks reduce their provision of trade finance in East Asia. Notwithstanding the actions of the G20 and other bodies to redress this, a substantial shortfall in trade finance facilities in the region remains. This article explores the development of this shortfall, and analyses potential responses to it. These responses range from some much-needed further revisions to the Basle III rules, to deepening of cross-border cooperation, creating a ring-fenced liquidity pool for trade finance, encouraging co-financing among the various providers of trade finance both private and public, and establishing a regional trade finance database. In addition, the article ponders the likelihood of China’s banks beginning to take a substantial role in providing trade finance to the region. Trade finance offers China’s banks a low risk means of expanding into international business, and offers China a way to provide the sort of important service to its region that regional leaders typically seek to provide.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185527
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, RP-
dc.contributor.authorArner, DW-
dc.contributor.authorStanley, R-
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-08T09:26:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-08T09:26:15Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationUniversity of New South Wales Faculty of Law Research Series, 2013, p. Working Paper 43-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185527-
dc.description.abstractThe crisis of 2008 saw many European banks reduce their provision of trade finance in East Asia. Notwithstanding the actions of the G20 and other bodies to redress this, a substantial shortfall in trade finance facilities in the region remains. This article explores the development of this shortfall, and analyses potential responses to it. These responses range from some much-needed further revisions to the Basle III rules, to deepening of cross-border cooperation, creating a ring-fenced liquidity pool for trade finance, encouraging co-financing among the various providers of trade finance both private and public, and establishing a regional trade finance database. In addition, the article ponders the likelihood of China’s banks beginning to take a substantial role in providing trade finance to the region. Trade finance offers China’s banks a low risk means of expanding into international business, and offers China a way to provide the sort of important service to its region that regional leaders typically seek to provide.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherUniversity of New South Wales Faculty of Law.-
dc.relation.ispartofUniversity of New South Wales Faculty of Law Research Series-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBanking and Finance-
dc.subjectCommercial Law-
dc.subjectComparative and Foreign Law-
dc.subjectInternational Trade-
dc.subjectLaw-
dc.titleTrade finance in East Asia - potential responses to the shortfallen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailArner, DW: dwarner@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.spageWorking Paper 43-
dc.identifier.epageWorking Paper 43-
dc.publisher.placeAustrialia-
dc.identifier.ssrn2293598-
dc.identifier.hkulrp2013/033-

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