File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Are there parental socialization effects on the sex-typed behavior of individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia?

TitleAre there parental socialization effects on the sex-typed behavior of individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia?
Authors
KeywordsCongenital Adrenal Hyperplasia
Gender Development
Gender Role
Parental Socialization
Sex-Typical Toy Play
Spatial Ability
Issue Date2013
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0004-0002
Citation
Archives Of Sexual Behavior, 2013, v. 42 n. 3, p. 381-391 How to Cite?
AbstractInfluences of prenatal androgen exposure on human sex-typical behavior have been established largely through studies of individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). However, evidence that addresses the potential confounding influence of parental socialization is limited. Parental socialization and its relationship to sex-typical toy play and spatial ability were investigated in two samples involving 137 individuals with CAH and 107 healthy controls. Females with CAH showed more boy-typical toy play and better targeting performance than control females, but did not differ in mental rotations performance. Males with CAH showed worse mental rotations performance than control males, but did not differ in sex-typical toy play or targeting. Reported parental encouragement of girl-typical toy play correlated with girl-typical toy play in all four groups. Moreover, parents reported encouraging less girl-typical, and more boy-typical, toy play in females with CAH than in control females and this reported encouragement partially mediated the relationship between CAH status and sex-typical toy play. Other evidence suggests that the reported parental encouragement of sex-atypical toy play in girls with CAH may be a response to the girls' preferences for boys' toys. Nevertheless, this encouragement could further increase boy-typical behavior in girls with CAH. In contrast to the results for toy play, we found no differential parental socialization for spatial activities and little evidence linking parental socialization to spatial ability. Overall, evidence suggests that prenatal androgen exposure and parental socialization both contribute to sex-typical toy play. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185493
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.704
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.198
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, WIen_US
dc.contributor.authorPasterski, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorHindmarsh, PCen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeffner, MEen_US
dc.contributor.authorHines, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-30T07:41:24Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-30T07:41:24Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Sexual Behavior, 2013, v. 42 n. 3, p. 381-391en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-0002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185493-
dc.description.abstractInfluences of prenatal androgen exposure on human sex-typical behavior have been established largely through studies of individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). However, evidence that addresses the potential confounding influence of parental socialization is limited. Parental socialization and its relationship to sex-typical toy play and spatial ability were investigated in two samples involving 137 individuals with CAH and 107 healthy controls. Females with CAH showed more boy-typical toy play and better targeting performance than control females, but did not differ in mental rotations performance. Males with CAH showed worse mental rotations performance than control males, but did not differ in sex-typical toy play or targeting. Reported parental encouragement of girl-typical toy play correlated with girl-typical toy play in all four groups. Moreover, parents reported encouraging less girl-typical, and more boy-typical, toy play in females with CAH than in control females and this reported encouragement partially mediated the relationship between CAH status and sex-typical toy play. Other evidence suggests that the reported parental encouragement of sex-atypical toy play in girls with CAH may be a response to the girls' preferences for boys' toys. Nevertheless, this encouragement could further increase boy-typical behavior in girls with CAH. In contrast to the results for toy play, we found no differential parental socialization for spatial activities and little evidence linking parental socialization to spatial ability. Overall, evidence suggests that prenatal androgen exposure and parental socialization both contribute to sex-typical toy play. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0004-0002en_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Sexual Behavioren_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectCongenital Adrenal Hyperplasiaen_US
dc.subjectGender Developmenten_US
dc.subjectGender Roleen_US
dc.subjectParental Socializationen_US
dc.subjectSex-Typical Toy Playen_US
dc.subjectSpatial Abilityen_US
dc.titleAre there parental socialization effects on the sex-typed behavior of individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10508-012-9997-4en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22810998-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84876283393en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros231116-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84876283393&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume42en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage381en_US
dc.identifier.epage391en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000316124600012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WI=55313239900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPasterski, V=8108722800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHindmarsh, PC=7102095952en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGeffner, ME=7004859737en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHines, M=7102576790en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats