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Article: Effects of hypochlorous acid exposure on the rejection of salt, polyethylene glycols, boron and arsenic(V) by nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes

TitleEffects of hypochlorous acid exposure on the rejection of salt, polyethylene glycols, boron and arsenic(V) by nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/watres
Citation
Water Research, 2012, v. 46 n. 16, p. 5217-5223 How to Cite?
AbstractThe separation layer of polyamide-based (PA) thin film composite (TFC) membranes can be modified by active chlorine species. The PA-TFC membranes, NF90, BW30 and NF270, were exposed to different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) at pH 5 for 24 h. Elemental composition obtained from X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) showed that the chlorine content in the PA layer increased with the chlorine concentrations. Treatment of membranes with 10 ppm Cl increased the membrane hydrophilicity. By contrast, when treated with 1000 ppm Cl or more, the membranes became less hydrophilic. Water permeability values for all 3 membrane types declined with increased chlorine concentrations. Filtration of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) with molecular weights of 200, 400 and 600 Daltons (Da) was performed to investigate the influence of chlorine treatment on membrane molecular weight cut off (MWCO) and rejection by size exclusion. Treatment with 10 and 100 ppm Cl lowered the MWCO while treatment with higher concentrations increased the MWCO. All chlorinated membranes experienced higher NaCl rejection compared to virgin ones. The performance of NF90 was tested with respect to the rejection of inorganic contaminants including boron (H3BO3) and arsenic (H2AsO4-). The boron rejection results paralleled PEG rejection whereas those for arsenic followed NaCl rejection patterns. The changes in membrane performance due to chlorine treatment were explained in terms of competing mechanisms: membrane tightening, bond cleavage by N-chlorination and chlorination promoted polyamide hydrolysis. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185430
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.991
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.772
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDo, VTen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, CYen_US
dc.contributor.authorReinhard, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLeckie, JOen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-30T07:32:28Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-30T07:32:28Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationWater Research, 2012, v. 46 n. 16, p. 5217-5223en_US
dc.identifier.issn0043-1354en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185430-
dc.description.abstractThe separation layer of polyamide-based (PA) thin film composite (TFC) membranes can be modified by active chlorine species. The PA-TFC membranes, NF90, BW30 and NF270, were exposed to different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) at pH 5 for 24 h. Elemental composition obtained from X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) showed that the chlorine content in the PA layer increased with the chlorine concentrations. Treatment of membranes with 10 ppm Cl increased the membrane hydrophilicity. By contrast, when treated with 1000 ppm Cl or more, the membranes became less hydrophilic. Water permeability values for all 3 membrane types declined with increased chlorine concentrations. Filtration of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) with molecular weights of 200, 400 and 600 Daltons (Da) was performed to investigate the influence of chlorine treatment on membrane molecular weight cut off (MWCO) and rejection by size exclusion. Treatment with 10 and 100 ppm Cl lowered the MWCO while treatment with higher concentrations increased the MWCO. All chlorinated membranes experienced higher NaCl rejection compared to virgin ones. The performance of NF90 was tested with respect to the rejection of inorganic contaminants including boron (H3BO3) and arsenic (H2AsO4-). The boron rejection results paralleled PEG rejection whereas those for arsenic followed NaCl rejection patterns. The changes in membrane performance due to chlorine treatment were explained in terms of competing mechanisms: membrane tightening, bond cleavage by N-chlorination and chlorination promoted polyamide hydrolysis. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/watresen_US
dc.relation.ispartofWater Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshArsenic - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshBoron - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshChlorine - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshFiltration - Instrumentation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrolysisen_US
dc.subject.meshHypochlorous Acid - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshMembranes, Artificialen_US
dc.subject.meshNanostructuresen_US
dc.subject.meshNylonsen_US
dc.subject.meshPhotoelectron Spectroscopyen_US
dc.subject.meshPolyethylene Glycols - Analysisen_US
dc.titleEffects of hypochlorous acid exposure on the rejection of salt, polyethylene glycols, boron and arsenic(V) by nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTang, CY: tangc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTang, CY=rp01765en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2012.06.044en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22818949-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865979750en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84865979750&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume46en_US
dc.identifier.issue16en_US
dc.identifier.spage5217en_US
dc.identifier.epage5223en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000309095800030-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDo, VT=54897725100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, CY=35489259800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridReinhard, M=55172613500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeckie, JO=7006717360en_US

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