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Conference Paper: Art-making in a Family Medicine Clerkship: How does it affect student empathy?

TitleArt-making in a Family Medicine Clerkship: How does it affect student empathy?
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherHong Kong College of Family Physicians.
Citation
The 2013 Hong Kong Primary Care Conference (HKPCC), Hong Kong, 16 June 2013. In Hong Kong Primary Care Conference 2013 Programme book, p. 53 How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: To provide patient-centred holistic care, family doctors in particular must possess interpersonal and empathic skills. Medical schools typically adopt a skills-based approach to such training. A novel arts-based approach may also help medical students develop empathic understanding of patients. METHODS: This was a mixed-method quantitative-qualitative study. In the 2011-12 academic year, all 161 third year medical students at the University of Hong Kong were allocated into either an art-making workshop or a problem solving workshop during the Family Medicine clerkship. Students in the art-making workshop wrote a poem, created artwork and completed a reflective essay while students in the conventional workshop problem-solved clinical cases and wrote an essay about the principles of family medicine. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) (student version) measured the level of empathy of students at the start and end of the clerkship. Within subjects ANOVA was used to compare the change within and between groups. Qualitative data were thematically analysed using a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: The quantitative results showed a decrease in JSE scores over time within groups but no statistically significant difference between groups. Qualitative analysis of creative work produced by students in the art-making group revealed understanding gained in relation to self, patients, pain and suffering, and the role of the doctor. DISCUSSION: Consistent with the literature, empathy declined over time in medical school. However, the arts-based approach enabled medical students to reflect on the caring aspect of medicine which contributes to empathic understanding. It also seemed to promote self-awareness, which can help them to recognize the potential for emotions to influence judgment which is of vital importance in clinical practice.
DescriptionConference Theme: Innovations in Primary Care
Poster Presentation no. 18
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185329

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, JYen_US
dc.contributor.authorPotash, JSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChau, TWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-15T11:02:34Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-15T11:02:34Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2013 Hong Kong Primary Care Conference (HKPCC), Hong Kong, 16 June 2013. In Hong Kong Primary Care Conference 2013 Programme book, p. 53en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185329-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Innovations in Primary Care-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation no. 18-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: To provide patient-centred holistic care, family doctors in particular must possess interpersonal and empathic skills. Medical schools typically adopt a skills-based approach to such training. A novel arts-based approach may also help medical students develop empathic understanding of patients. METHODS: This was a mixed-method quantitative-qualitative study. In the 2011-12 academic year, all 161 third year medical students at the University of Hong Kong were allocated into either an art-making workshop or a problem solving workshop during the Family Medicine clerkship. Students in the art-making workshop wrote a poem, created artwork and completed a reflective essay while students in the conventional workshop problem-solved clinical cases and wrote an essay about the principles of family medicine. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) (student version) measured the level of empathy of students at the start and end of the clerkship. Within subjects ANOVA was used to compare the change within and between groups. Qualitative data were thematically analysed using a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: The quantitative results showed a decrease in JSE scores over time within groups but no statistically significant difference between groups. Qualitative analysis of creative work produced by students in the art-making group revealed understanding gained in relation to self, patients, pain and suffering, and the role of the doctor. DISCUSSION: Consistent with the literature, empathy declined over time in medical school. However, the arts-based approach enabled medical students to reflect on the caring aspect of medicine which contributes to empathic understanding. It also seemed to promote self-awareness, which can help them to recognize the potential for emotions to influence judgment which is of vital importance in clinical practice.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong College of Family Physicians.-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Primary Care Conference, HKPCC 2013en_US
dc.titleArt-making in a Family Medicine Clerkship: How does it affect student empathy?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, JY: chenjy@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPotash, JS: jspotash@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK: clklam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChau, TW: chautw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, JY=rp00526en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros215034en_US
dc.identifier.spage53-
dc.identifier.epage53-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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