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Conference Paper: Associations of ambient air pollution with influenza virus activity in a subtropical city

TitleAssociations of ambient air pollution with influenza virus activity in a subtropical city
Authors
KeywordsAir pollution
Influenza
Temperature
Humidity
Subtropics
Issue Date2012
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
Citation
The 24th Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE 2012), Columbia, SC., 26-30 August 2012. In Epidemiology, 2012, v. 23 n. 5S, p. S-235, abstract O-178 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: It is evident from experimental studies that air pollutants could facilitate the transmission of influenza viruses and also increase the severity of infections. However, few studies have addressed the effects of air pollutants on influenza virus activity in the community. OBJECTIVES: We assessed the temporal association of air pollutant concentration with influenza virus activity during 1998-2008 in Hong Kong METHODS: We fitted a Poisson regression model of influenza virus activity on the explanatory variables of ambient concentrations of four air pollutants: particulate matters with the aerodynamic diameter less than 10μm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3). Virus activity was measured by weekly proportions of positive influenza isolates in specimens sent for making diagnosis to the microbiology laboratory of Queen Mary Hospital. The dose response relationship between air pollution and influenza was assessed by natural spline smoothing functions. RESULTS: The weekly concentrations of air pollutants showed one big peak in January/February and a small peak in May. This pattern was similar to the seasonal pattern of influenza virus activity. Influenza activity was significantly (p<0.05) associated with SO2 in a linear manner within the range of 0 -30μg/m3, as well as with O3 after reaching 20μg/m3. However, the associations of influenza virus activity with PM10 and NO2 were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Air pollutant concentrations were associated with influenza virus activity in the community of Hong Kong, suggesting that air pollution may be an environmental factor that regulates the seasonal outbreaks of influenza in the subtropical climate.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: ISEE 2012 Conference Abstracts 5S
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185327
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.075
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.981

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KPen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-15T11:01:52Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-15T11:01:52Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 24th Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE 2012), Columbia, SC., 26-30 August 2012. In Epidemiology, 2012, v. 23 n. 5S, p. S-235, abstract O-178en_US
dc.identifier.issn1044-3983-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/185327-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: ISEE 2012 Conference Abstracts 5S-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: It is evident from experimental studies that air pollutants could facilitate the transmission of influenza viruses and also increase the severity of infections. However, few studies have addressed the effects of air pollutants on influenza virus activity in the community. OBJECTIVES: We assessed the temporal association of air pollutant concentration with influenza virus activity during 1998-2008 in Hong Kong METHODS: We fitted a Poisson regression model of influenza virus activity on the explanatory variables of ambient concentrations of four air pollutants: particulate matters with the aerodynamic diameter less than 10μm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3). Virus activity was measured by weekly proportions of positive influenza isolates in specimens sent for making diagnosis to the microbiology laboratory of Queen Mary Hospital. The dose response relationship between air pollution and influenza was assessed by natural spline smoothing functions. RESULTS: The weekly concentrations of air pollutants showed one big peak in January/February and a small peak in May. This pattern was similar to the seasonal pattern of influenza virus activity. Influenza activity was significantly (p<0.05) associated with SO2 in a linear manner within the range of 0 -30μg/m3, as well as with O3 after reaching 20μg/m3. However, the associations of influenza virus activity with PM10 and NO2 were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Air pollutant concentrations were associated with influenza virus activity in the community of Hong Kong, suggesting that air pollution may be an environmental factor that regulates the seasonal outbreaks of influenza in the subtropical climate.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectAir pollution-
dc.subjectInfluenza-
dc.subjectTemperature-
dc.subjectHumidity-
dc.subjectSubtropics-
dc.titleAssociations of ambient air pollution with influenza virus activity in a subtropical cityen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM: hrmrwcm@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, L: linyang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, KP: kpchanaa@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, M: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, M=rp00410en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.ede.0000416835.74371.8f-
dc.identifier.hkuros216692en_US
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue5S-
dc.identifier.spageS-235en_US
dc.identifier.epageS-235en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 131122-

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