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Conference Paper: Apparent temperature associated mortality risk and effect modification by sex and education in an elderly cohort of Hong Kong Chinese

TitleApparent temperature associated mortality risk and effect modification by sex and education in an elderly cohort of Hong Kong Chinese
Authors
KeywordsThermal stress
Apparent temperature
Mortality
Elderly cohort
Hong Kong
Issue Date2012
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
Citation
The 24th Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE 2012), Columbia, SC., 26-30 August 2012. In Epidemiology, 2012, v. 23 n. 5S, p. S-548, abstract P-142 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the effects of thermal stress on mortality and susceptibility of socio-economic subgroups. OBJECTIVES: To assess associations between apparent temperature and mortality and their possible modification by sex and education. METHODS: We used a matched case-control design to assess short-term effects on mortality of apparent temperature, as a time-dependent variable, in a cohort of 66,820 persons aged 65 years or older recruited in 1998-2001 and followed up until 2009. The cases (14,446 deaths) were matched with controls by duration of exposure with adjustment for particulate and baseline covariates. Further, associations for gender and education subgroups were analyzed. RESULTS: In cool season, for a 1oC decrease in moving average of current day and previous 6 days, apparent temperature was associated with 2.0% (95% CI:0.9, 3.0), 2.8% (0.8, 4.8) and 4.0% (1.3, 6.7) increased risk for all-cause, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality, respectively, which were higher in females than males. The increased risks were significant (p<0.05) in subjects with primary education 2.6% (1.0, 4.1) for all-cause mortality and 4.1% (1.0, 7.1) for cardiovascular mortality; with no formal education 4.9% (1.4, 8.3) for respiratory mortality; but were not significant in those with secondary education or above. CONCLUSIONS: In cool season, decrease in apparent temperature was associated with increase in risk of all-cause and cardiorespiratory mortality, with females more susceptible to the effects than males. But during warm season, the effects of apparent temperature were not evident for the whole and subgroups.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: ISEE 2012 Conference Abstracts 5S
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184979
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.075
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.981

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThach, TQen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorChau, YKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, HKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, SLen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, WMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-15T10:20:32Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-15T10:20:32Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 24th Annual Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE 2012), Columbia, SC., 26-30 August 2012. In Epidemiology, 2012, v. 23 n. 5S, p. S-548, abstract P-142en_US
dc.identifier.issn1044-3983-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184979-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: ISEE 2012 Conference Abstracts 5S-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the effects of thermal stress on mortality and susceptibility of socio-economic subgroups. OBJECTIVES: To assess associations between apparent temperature and mortality and their possible modification by sex and education. METHODS: We used a matched case-control design to assess short-term effects on mortality of apparent temperature, as a time-dependent variable, in a cohort of 66,820 persons aged 65 years or older recruited in 1998-2001 and followed up until 2009. The cases (14,446 deaths) were matched with controls by duration of exposure with adjustment for particulate and baseline covariates. Further, associations for gender and education subgroups were analyzed. RESULTS: In cool season, for a 1oC decrease in moving average of current day and previous 6 days, apparent temperature was associated with 2.0% (95% CI:0.9, 3.0), 2.8% (0.8, 4.8) and 4.0% (1.3, 6.7) increased risk for all-cause, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality, respectively, which were higher in females than males. The increased risks were significant (p<0.05) in subjects with primary education 2.6% (1.0, 4.1) for all-cause mortality and 4.1% (1.0, 7.1) for cardiovascular mortality; with no formal education 4.9% (1.4, 8.3) for respiratory mortality; but were not significant in those with secondary education or above. CONCLUSIONS: In cool season, decrease in apparent temperature was associated with increase in risk of all-cause and cardiorespiratory mortality, with females more susceptible to the effects than males. But during warm season, the effects of apparent temperature were not evident for the whole and subgroups.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectThermal stress-
dc.subjectApparent temperature-
dc.subjectMortality-
dc.subjectElderly cohort-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.titleApparent temperature associated mortality risk and effect modification by sex and education in an elderly cohort of Hong Kong Chineseen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailThach, TQ: thach@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChau, YK: ykchau@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, HK: hklai@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ: hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM: hrmrwcm@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityThach, TQ=rp00450en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, HK=rp01527en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.ede.0000417146.95851.54-
dc.identifier.hkuros216693en_US
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue5S-
dc.identifier.spageS-548en_US
dc.identifier.epageS-548en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 131122-

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