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Conference Paper: Primary care models - Let a hundred flowers bloom

TitlePrimary care models - Let a hundred flowers bloom
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherHong Kong College of Family Physicians.
Citation
Hong Kong Primary Care Conference 2013 (HKPCC 2013): Innovations in Primary Care, Hong Kong, 16 June 2013. In Hong Kong Primary Care Conference 2013 Programme book, p. 16 How to Cite?
AbstractThe contrast between the eventualities of the 1985 Scott Report and the 1990 Working Party on Primary Health Care Report could not have been more stark. The World Health Organisation reminded member states, through the 2008 World Health Report Primary care: now more than ever, to put into action what had been declared in Alma Ata 30 years ago. Twenty years after the Working Party report, the Government finally set out more concrete directions for primary care development in a 2010 Strategy Document. The time has come to execute those ideals and to turn rhetoric into reality. An evolutionary, evaluative approach that recognises real politik would be preferred over a system-wide revolution. The various pilot schemes involving direct provision/subvention (in the form of community health centres), outsourcing (whether wholesale as in the Tin Shui Wai model or by disease condition as for hypertension and diabetes) and vouchers (elderly and vaccine programmes) could be expanded to experiment with other different models of service delivery. These may include the American “medical home”, Australia’s medicare locals, Britain’s general practice with commissioning responsibilities or the Ontario blended family health models, amongst other innovative forms. An equally important priority would be to understand and work with the contextual circumstances of existing primary care providers. The politico-economic ecology of private ambulatory care, which provides 80% of services, has undergone substantial changes recently that need to be accounted for when planning reform. Primary care reform should no longer remain an afterthought or at best paid lip service. It should be allowed to experiment, be evaluated and implemented – now more than ever.
DescriptionAbstract and powerpoint presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184943

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-15T10:20:18Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-15T10:20:18Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Primary Care Conference 2013 (HKPCC 2013): Innovations in Primary Care, Hong Kong, 16 June 2013. In Hong Kong Primary Care Conference 2013 Programme book, p. 16en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184943-
dc.descriptionAbstract and powerpoint presentation-
dc.description.abstractThe contrast between the eventualities of the 1985 Scott Report and the 1990 Working Party on Primary Health Care Report could not have been more stark. The World Health Organisation reminded member states, through the 2008 World Health Report Primary care: now more than ever, to put into action what had been declared in Alma Ata 30 years ago. Twenty years after the Working Party report, the Government finally set out more concrete directions for primary care development in a 2010 Strategy Document. The time has come to execute those ideals and to turn rhetoric into reality. An evolutionary, evaluative approach that recognises real politik would be preferred over a system-wide revolution. The various pilot schemes involving direct provision/subvention (in the form of community health centres), outsourcing (whether wholesale as in the Tin Shui Wai model or by disease condition as for hypertension and diabetes) and vouchers (elderly and vaccine programmes) could be expanded to experiment with other different models of service delivery. These may include the American “medical home”, Australia’s medicare locals, Britain’s general practice with commissioning responsibilities or the Ontario blended family health models, amongst other innovative forms. An equally important priority would be to understand and work with the contextual circumstances of existing primary care providers. The politico-economic ecology of private ambulatory care, which provides 80% of services, has undergone substantial changes recently that need to be accounted for when planning reform. Primary care reform should no longer remain an afterthought or at best paid lip service. It should be allowed to experiment, be evaluated and implemented – now more than ever.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong College of Family Physicians.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Primary Care Conference 2013, 16 June 2013, Hong Kongen_US
dc.titlePrimary care models - Let a hundred flowers bloomen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros215137en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-
dc.customcontrol.immutableyiu 140221-

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