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Article: The effects on sensorimotor performance and balance with Tai Chi training

TitleThe effects on sensorimotor performance and balance with Tai Chi training
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/apmr
Citation
Archives Of Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation, 2006, v. 87 n. 1, p. 82-87 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To compare the effects of short-term and long-term Tai Chi training on the sensorimotor and balance performance of able-bodied subjects. Design: A nonrandomized cross-sectional controlled trial. Setting: Sport laboratory. Participants: Forty-eight healthy subjects, 16 with 3 months of experience in Tai Chi training, 16 with 1 to 3 years of experience in Tai Chi training, and 16 with no experience in Tai Chi training. Intervention: Experimental. Main Outcome Measures: The reflex contraction latencies (reaction time) of medial hamstrings and gastrocnemius after perturbation, the active knee joint angle-repositioning error, and the balance time on a tilt board were measured and analyzed with 1-way analysis of covariance. Significant results were further analyzed with post hoc linear contrasts. Results: Long-term Tai Chi practitioners had a significantly faster reflex reaction time in hamstrings (P<.000) and gastrocnemius (P=.043) muscles and a longer balance time on a tilt board (P<.000) than short-term Tai Chi practitioners and nonpractitioners. Both long- and short-term Tai Chi practitioners had significantly less knee joint angle-repositioning error than nonpractitioners (P=.001 and P=.027, respectively). Conclusions: Tai Chi training of more than 1 year might have the benefits of faster hamstrings and gastrocnemius reflex reaction and improved knee joint position sense (JPS). These changes might be associated with an improved dynamic standing balance. Better knee JPS was shown in subjects with 3 months of Tai Chi practice, but this had not led to a significant improvement in balance. © 2006 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184214
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.045
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFong, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, GYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-25T03:02:12Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-25T03:02:12Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation, 2006, v. 87 n. 1, p. 82-87en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-9993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184214-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To compare the effects of short-term and long-term Tai Chi training on the sensorimotor and balance performance of able-bodied subjects. Design: A nonrandomized cross-sectional controlled trial. Setting: Sport laboratory. Participants: Forty-eight healthy subjects, 16 with 3 months of experience in Tai Chi training, 16 with 1 to 3 years of experience in Tai Chi training, and 16 with no experience in Tai Chi training. Intervention: Experimental. Main Outcome Measures: The reflex contraction latencies (reaction time) of medial hamstrings and gastrocnemius after perturbation, the active knee joint angle-repositioning error, and the balance time on a tilt board were measured and analyzed with 1-way analysis of covariance. Significant results were further analyzed with post hoc linear contrasts. Results: Long-term Tai Chi practitioners had a significantly faster reflex reaction time in hamstrings (P<.000) and gastrocnemius (P=.043) muscles and a longer balance time on a tilt board (P<.000) than short-term Tai Chi practitioners and nonpractitioners. Both long- and short-term Tai Chi practitioners had significantly less knee joint angle-repositioning error than nonpractitioners (P=.001 and P=.027, respectively). Conclusions: Tai Chi training of more than 1 year might have the benefits of faster hamstrings and gastrocnemius reflex reaction and improved knee joint position sense (JPS). These changes might be associated with an improved dynamic standing balance. Better knee JPS was shown in subjects with 3 months of Tai Chi practice, but this had not led to a significant improvement in balance. © 2006 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/apmren_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitationen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshKnee Joint - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPostural Balance - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPosture - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProbabilityen_US
dc.subject.meshProprioception - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRange Of Motion, Articular - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshReaction Time - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_US
dc.subject.meshReflex - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSensitivity And Specificityen_US
dc.subject.meshTai Ji - Methodsen_US
dc.titleThe effects on sensorimotor performance and balance with Tai Chi trainingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailFong, SM: smfong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFong, SM=rp01759en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apmr.2005.09.017en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16401443-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-30144436713en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-30144436713&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume87en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage82en_US
dc.identifier.epage87en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000234670500014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, SM=7102255872en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, GY=7102563754en_US

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