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Article: Gated communities, sustainable cities and a tragedy of the urban commons

TitleGated communities, sustainable cities and a tragedy of the urban commons
Authors
KeywordsPublic policy
Community planning
Environmental sustainability
Private communities
Private residential community
Club economy
Issue Date2006
PublisherUCLA Department of Urban Planning. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.gsa.asucla.ucla.edu/services/publications/critical-planning
Citation
Critical Planning, 2006, v. 13, p. 41-62 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper explores the political, financial and environmental sustainability of private communities. Using a theoretical approach that views the private residential community as a club economy, we analyze the planning and managing practices of 219 gated residential communities in the Los Angeles area. This investigation demonstrates that private urban governance is a locally sustainable solution that might help stabilize the financing of urban growth, redevelop aging neighborhoods, maintain social diversity, conserve non-renewable urban resources, and encourage reinvestment in urban infrastructure. However, these gains are not made without social costs and spillovers. Breaking down municipal management into smaller units might deliver a more economically sustainable urban system on the whole, but only at the expense of marginalizing those excluded from the club economy. In addition, private urban governance is still dependent on state subsidy. This new urban dynamic will become more important as private associations attempt to increase the public subsidy of their activities and municipal governments look for ways to reduce their liabilities through private sector providers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184048

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeGoix, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-20T08:27:35Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-20T08:27:35Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationCritical Planning, 2006, v. 13, p. 41-62en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/184048-
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the political, financial and environmental sustainability of private communities. Using a theoretical approach that views the private residential community as a club economy, we analyze the planning and managing practices of 219 gated residential communities in the Los Angeles area. This investigation demonstrates that private urban governance is a locally sustainable solution that might help stabilize the financing of urban growth, redevelop aging neighborhoods, maintain social diversity, conserve non-renewable urban resources, and encourage reinvestment in urban infrastructure. However, these gains are not made without social costs and spillovers. Breaking down municipal management into smaller units might deliver a more economically sustainable urban system on the whole, but only at the expense of marginalizing those excluded from the club economy. In addition, private urban governance is still dependent on state subsidy. This new urban dynamic will become more important as private associations attempt to increase the public subsidy of their activities and municipal governments look for ways to reduce their liabilities through private sector providers.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUCLA Department of Urban Planning. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.gsa.asucla.ucla.edu/services/publications/critical-planning-
dc.relation.ispartofCritical Planningen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectPublic policy-
dc.subjectCommunity planning-
dc.subjectEnvironmental sustainability-
dc.subjectPrivate communities-
dc.subjectPrivate residential community-
dc.subjectClub economy-
dc.titleGated communities, sustainable cities and a tragedy of the urban commonsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWebster, CJ: cwebster@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, CJ=rp01747en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.spage41en_US
dc.identifier.epage62en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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