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Conference Paper: "Pauvre Xen Jang, sans vie, sans foi": numbers that measured Catholic Faith in Northeast China

Title"Pauvre Xen Jang, sans vie, sans foi": numbers that measured Catholic Faith in Northeast China
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAssociation for Asian Studies, Inc..
Citation
The 2011 Joint Conference of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) and the International Convention of Asia Scholars (ICAS), Honolulu, HI., 31 March-3 April 2011. How to Cite?
AbstractThis is a study of a bilateral dialogue between contradictories: Christians and pagans, missionaries and converts, foreign and native, male and female, and above all the sacred and the profane. In this dialogue, missionaries not only took pains to record numbers in their annual statistical reports in order to measure Catholic faith in local communities but also took an effort to translate such numerical local experience into religious explanations. Focusing on the Manchuria Mission founded by the Mission Etrangères de Paris (MEP) in the height of missionary expansion in the nineteenth century, I examine how the MEP translated and disseminated the universality of the Christian message into the particular context of northeast China. In particular, this paper focuses on systematic parish reports that measured and assessed the success of local religious experience. The dissemination of Christian faith included translations of literal languages such as French and Chinese as well as of numerical languages that observed and measured the “faith” of local converts: how often must a convert confess to become a “good” Christian? How many times must communion be conducted in a village to turn it into a “good” Christian community? I seek to probe this 'numerical translingual practice' in the broader context of historical methodology, using it as an approach to explore the relation between historians and historical numbers, asking how historians’ understanding and interpretation structure disparate sets of discourses within their field.
DescriptionInterarea/Border-Crossing Session 133. 3, 2, 1, 0: Numbers as Object and Method in the Study of East Asia
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183982

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-18T04:35:12Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-18T04:35:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2011 Joint Conference of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) and the International Convention of Asia Scholars (ICAS), Honolulu, HI., 31 March-3 April 2011.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183982-
dc.descriptionInterarea/Border-Crossing Session 133. 3, 2, 1, 0: Numbers as Object and Method in the Study of East Asia-
dc.description.abstractThis is a study of a bilateral dialogue between contradictories: Christians and pagans, missionaries and converts, foreign and native, male and female, and above all the sacred and the profane. In this dialogue, missionaries not only took pains to record numbers in their annual statistical reports in order to measure Catholic faith in local communities but also took an effort to translate such numerical local experience into religious explanations. Focusing on the Manchuria Mission founded by the Mission Etrangères de Paris (MEP) in the height of missionary expansion in the nineteenth century, I examine how the MEP translated and disseminated the universality of the Christian message into the particular context of northeast China. In particular, this paper focuses on systematic parish reports that measured and assessed the success of local religious experience. The dissemination of Christian faith included translations of literal languages such as French and Chinese as well as of numerical languages that observed and measured the “faith” of local converts: how often must a convert confess to become a “good” Christian? How many times must communion be conducted in a village to turn it into a “good” Christian community? I seek to probe this 'numerical translingual practice' in the broader context of historical methodology, using it as an approach to explore the relation between historians and historical numbers, asking how historians’ understanding and interpretation structure disparate sets of discourses within their field.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Asian Studies, Inc..-
dc.relation.ispartofAAS-ICAS Joint Conferenceen_US
dc.title"Pauvre Xen Jang, sans vie, sans foi": numbers that measured Catholic Faith in Northeast Chinaen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, J: liji66@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, J=rp01657en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros214532en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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