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Article: Individuality or conformity? Identity in personal and university academic homepages

TitleIndividuality or conformity? Identity in personal and university academic homepages
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/compcom
Citation
Computers and Composition, 2012, v. 29 n. 4, p. 309–322 How to Cite?
AbstractThe connection between writing and identity has been a subject of academic interest for some time and there is now broad agreement that identity is created from the texts we engage in and the semiotic choices we make. In this view, the process of constructing an identity most clearly involves selecting materials to present to others, a process which is seen most directly in personal homepages. It has become almost obligatory for academics to maintain some kind of online presence, although these homepages can also serve the university in several ways and therefore suppresses more personal facets of identity and act to position the author as an employee. As a result, many academics seek to escape the bland uniformity of the university personal page to present a more multi-faceted identity in a self-managed homepage. This paper explores the this relatively neglected area of composition to show how identity is discursively constructed in a corpus of 100 homepages of 50 academics, one university-managed and the other personally created. Focusing on textual content, design, links and photographs, I contrast some of the ways that academics elect to represent themselves as academics in these two environments.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183959
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.547

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHyland, KLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-18T04:33:27Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-18T04:33:27Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationComputers and Composition, 2012, v. 29 n. 4, p. 309–322en_US
dc.identifier.issn8755-4615-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183959-
dc.description.abstractThe connection between writing and identity has been a subject of academic interest for some time and there is now broad agreement that identity is created from the texts we engage in and the semiotic choices we make. In this view, the process of constructing an identity most clearly involves selecting materials to present to others, a process which is seen most directly in personal homepages. It has become almost obligatory for academics to maintain some kind of online presence, although these homepages can also serve the university in several ways and therefore suppresses more personal facets of identity and act to position the author as an employee. As a result, many academics seek to escape the bland uniformity of the university personal page to present a more multi-faceted identity in a self-managed homepage. This paper explores the this relatively neglected area of composition to show how identity is discursively constructed in a corpus of 100 homepages of 50 academics, one university-managed and the other personally created. Focusing on textual content, design, links and photographs, I contrast some of the ways that academics elect to represent themselves as academics in these two environments.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/compcom-
dc.relation.ispartofComputers and Compositionen_US
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Computers and Composition. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Computers and Composition, 2012, v. 29 n. 4, p. 309–322. DOI: 10.1016/j.compcom.2012.10.002-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleIndividuality or conformity? Identity in personal and university academic homepagesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHyland, KL: khyland@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHyland, KL=rp01133en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.compcom.2012.10.002-
dc.identifier.hkuros214497en_US
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage309en_US
dc.identifier.epage322en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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