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Article: Innovating Instruction: English in the Discipline at the University of Hong Kong

TitleInnovating Instruction: English in the Discipline at the University of Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsCurriculum reform
English in the Discipline
Specificity
Academic literacy
Issue Date2013
PublisherUniversity of Hong Kong, English Centre. The Journal's web site is located at http://ec.hku.hk/hkjal
Citation
Hong Kong Journal of Applied Linguistics, 2013, v. 14 n. 2, p. 3-19 How to Cite?
AbstractThe 2012 educational reforms in Hong Kong are a unique curriculum innovation, dramatically increasing Hong Kong’s tertiary intake and offering opportunities for universities to move to a less specialized and more holistic student-oriented approach to undergraduate education. For those of us responsible for English language provision it also presents considerable challenges and raises some key questions about the kind of English that we should be teaching. At the University of Hong Kong (HKU) students will be required to take 12 credits of English, double the current number, and half of these must be in the form of ‘English in the Discipline’. This recognizes that because the conventions of academic communication differ considerably across disciplines, identifying the particular language features, discourse practices, and communicative skills of target groups becomes central to teaching English in universities. In this paper I outline what this means in practice and argue for a more context-sensitive approach to English provision, based on closer cooperation with academic disciplines and research-informed course design.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183958
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHyland, Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-18T04:33:27Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-18T04:33:27Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Journal of Applied Linguistics, 2013, v. 14 n. 2, p. 3-19en_US
dc.identifier.issn1028-4435-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183958-
dc.description.abstractThe 2012 educational reforms in Hong Kong are a unique curriculum innovation, dramatically increasing Hong Kong’s tertiary intake and offering opportunities for universities to move to a less specialized and more holistic student-oriented approach to undergraduate education. For those of us responsible for English language provision it also presents considerable challenges and raises some key questions about the kind of English that we should be teaching. At the University of Hong Kong (HKU) students will be required to take 12 credits of English, double the current number, and half of these must be in the form of ‘English in the Discipline’. This recognizes that because the conventions of academic communication differ considerably across disciplines, identifying the particular language features, discourse practices, and communicative skills of target groups becomes central to teaching English in universities. In this paper I outline what this means in practice and argue for a more context-sensitive approach to English provision, based on closer cooperation with academic disciplines and research-informed course design.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Hong Kong, English Centre. The Journal's web site is located at http://ec.hku.hk/hkjal-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Journal of Applied Linguisticsen_US
dc.subjectCurriculum reform-
dc.subjectEnglish in the Discipline-
dc.subjectSpecificity-
dc.subjectAcademic literacy-
dc.titleInnovating Instruction: English in the Discipline at the University of Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHyland, K: khyland@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHyland, KL=rp01133en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros214496en_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage3en_US
dc.identifier.epage19en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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