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Article: “You don’t miss your water ‘Til your river runs dry”: Regulating industrial supply shortages after “China raw materials”

Title“You don’t miss your water ‘Til your river runs dry”: Regulating industrial supply shortages after “China raw materials”
Authors
KeywordsWTO
China
US
EU
Raw materials
Export restrictions
Rare earths
Obama
National security
Issue Date2012
PublisherStanford University, Stanford Law School. The Journal's web site is located at http://sjlbf.stanford.edu/
Citation
Stanford Journal of Law, Business & Finance, 2012, v. 18 n. 1, p. 72-120 How to Cite?
AbstractGlobal industrial production depends on stable access to raw inputs. Food price volatility has emerged as a major concern for Group of Twenty Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors (G20), while we are hearing new calls for bringing global disciplines to resource cartels like the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). Supply chains that make up globalized production recently demonstrated their potential fragility when Chinese sovereign intervention threatened to bring Japan's high-tech manufacturing to its knees by cutting off its supplies. These wide-ranging issues are now being addressed under the umbrella of trade regulation. As a result, we are witnessing a shift from the old trade regulatory model of the past six decades - where trade negotiators focused on import barriers and reciprocal concessions and export restrictions were justified typically on grounds of national security and foreign policy - towards the realization of an increasing need to tighten global rules on export restrictions. Although commodity and resource prices are at least partly market- driven, sovereign intervention has finally emerged as a clear concern. The Obama Administration's first suit brought before the World Trade Organization (WTO) concerned Chinese export restrictions on nine commodities, including magnesium, coke, yellow phosphorus, and zinc, and]esulted in victory. Yet real General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) disciplines on export price measures, quotas and other conditions have been sparse.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183626
ISSN
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLim, CL-
dc.contributor.authorSenduk, JH-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-30T01:40:30Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-30T01:40:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationStanford Journal of Law, Business & Finance, 2012, v. 18 n. 1, p. 72-120-
dc.identifier.issn1078-8794-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183626-
dc.description.abstractGlobal industrial production depends on stable access to raw inputs. Food price volatility has emerged as a major concern for Group of Twenty Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors (G20), while we are hearing new calls for bringing global disciplines to resource cartels like the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). Supply chains that make up globalized production recently demonstrated their potential fragility when Chinese sovereign intervention threatened to bring Japan's high-tech manufacturing to its knees by cutting off its supplies. These wide-ranging issues are now being addressed under the umbrella of trade regulation. As a result, we are witnessing a shift from the old trade regulatory model of the past six decades - where trade negotiators focused on import barriers and reciprocal concessions and export restrictions were justified typically on grounds of national security and foreign policy - towards the realization of an increasing need to tighten global rules on export restrictions. Although commodity and resource prices are at least partly market- driven, sovereign intervention has finally emerged as a clear concern. The Obama Administration's first suit brought before the World Trade Organization (WTO) concerned Chinese export restrictions on nine commodities, including magnesium, coke, yellow phosphorus, and zinc, and]esulted in victory. Yet real General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) disciplines on export price measures, quotas and other conditions have been sparse.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherStanford University, Stanford Law School. The Journal's web site is located at http://sjlbf.stanford.edu/-
dc.relation.ispartofStanford Journal of Law, Business & Finance-
dc.subjectWTO-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectUS-
dc.subjectEU-
dc.subjectRaw materials-
dc.subjectExport restrictions-
dc.subjectRare earths-
dc.subjectObama-
dc.subjectNational security-
dc.title“You don’t miss your water ‘Til your river runs dry”: Regulating industrial supply shortages after “China raw materials”en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLim, CL: cllim@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros222252-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage72-
dc.identifier.epage120-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.ssrn2255301-
dc.identifier.hkulrp2013/016-
dc.customcontrol.immutablecsl 140227-

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