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Article: Retinal microvascular signs and cognitive impairment

TitleRetinal microvascular signs and cognitive impairment
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGS
Citation
Journal Of The American Geriatrics Society, 2009, v. 57 n. 10, p. 1892-1896 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To examine the association between retinal microvascular signs, as a proxy for cerebral microvascular disease, and cognitive impairment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional population-based study. SETTING: Urban population survey PARTICIPANTS: One thousand nine hundred eighty-eight persons aged 49 to 97. MEASUREMENTS: All participants underwent retinal photography and had the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) administered by trained personnel. Retinal photographs were masked and graded for retinopathy signs (microaneurysms, hemorrhages, hard exudates, cotton wool spots), and retinal vessel calibers were measured using a validated computer-assisted method. Cognitive impairment was defined as an MMSE score of 23 or less, in line with other epidemiological studies. RESULTS: Cognitive impairment was present in 121 participants (6.1%). In the total population, after adjusting for age, sex, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, smoking, cardiovascular disease, education, and other factors, retinal venular dilation was associated with cognitive impairment (odds ratio (OR)=1.8, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=1.0-3.2, P=.03). In persons with hypertension, retinopathy signs (adjusted OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.0-3.2, P=.05) and retinal venular dilation (adjusted OR=2.7, 95% CI=1.2-6.1, P=.01) were associated with cognitive impairment. CONCLUSION: Retinal microvascular signs are associated with significant cognitive impairment, particularly in older persons with hypertension. These findings suggest that cerebral microvascular changes may contribute to cognitive deterioration. © 2009, The American Geriatrics Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183579
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.842
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.236
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiew, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, TYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLindley, RIen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorKaushik, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, JJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-28T06:14:55Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-28T06:14:55Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Geriatrics Society, 2009, v. 57 n. 10, p. 1892-1896en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-8614en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183579-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To examine the association between retinal microvascular signs, as a proxy for cerebral microvascular disease, and cognitive impairment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional population-based study. SETTING: Urban population survey PARTICIPANTS: One thousand nine hundred eighty-eight persons aged 49 to 97. MEASUREMENTS: All participants underwent retinal photography and had the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) administered by trained personnel. Retinal photographs were masked and graded for retinopathy signs (microaneurysms, hemorrhages, hard exudates, cotton wool spots), and retinal vessel calibers were measured using a validated computer-assisted method. Cognitive impairment was defined as an MMSE score of 23 or less, in line with other epidemiological studies. RESULTS: Cognitive impairment was present in 121 participants (6.1%). In the total population, after adjusting for age, sex, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, smoking, cardiovascular disease, education, and other factors, retinal venular dilation was associated with cognitive impairment (odds ratio (OR)=1.8, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=1.0-3.2, P=.03). In persons with hypertension, retinopathy signs (adjusted OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.0-3.2, P=.05) and retinal venular dilation (adjusted OR=2.7, 95% CI=1.2-6.1, P=.01) were associated with cognitive impairment. CONCLUSION: Retinal microvascular signs are associated with significant cognitive impairment, particularly in older persons with hypertension. These findings suggest that cerebral microvascular changes may contribute to cognitive deterioration. © 2009, The American Geriatrics Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGSen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Geriatrics Societyen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshCerebrovascular Disorders - Complications - Diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMicrovesselsen_US
dc.subject.meshRetinal Vesselsen_US
dc.subject.meshVascular Diseases - Complications - Diagnosisen_US
dc.titleRetinal microvascular signs and cognitive impairmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, N: dannycheung@hotmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, N=rp01752en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1532-5415.2009.02459.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid19737331-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70350426229en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70350426229&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume57en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1892en_US
dc.identifier.epage1896en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000270551300022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiew, G=12796147900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMitchell, P=7402933815en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, TY=35231271400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLindley, RI=35292865800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, N=8054683900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKaushik, S=16031338100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, JJ=8853324200en_US

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