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Article: Built environment configuration and change in body mass index: The Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS)

TitleBuilt environment configuration and change in body mass index: The Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS)
Authors
KeywordsAccessibility
Bmi
Built Environment
Multilevel
Space Syntax
Issue Date2013
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/healthplace
Citation
Health And Place, 2013, v. 19 n. 1, p. 33-44 How to Cite?
AbstractThere exist no long term longitudinal studies assessing BMI trends of older adults in relation to the built environment. We employed cohort data from the Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS) to analyze the long term independent associations between a broad set of built environmental factors and change in BMI measured at three time points over a 12-year period. Built environment morphological metrics (morphometrics) used include measures of land use accessibility and space syntax modelled street network accessibility. A multilevel modelling framework was adopted wherein measurement occasions were nested within individuals and individuals were nested within LSOA census areas. BMI was observed to be significantly (p<0.05) associated with a number of built environment factors including mix; density of retail, churches, recreational and leisure services; street network accessibility as well as slope variability. Controlling for socio-demographic and lifestyle factors and for vascular diseases had negligible impact upon the influence of built environmental factors highlighting the importance of urban design and planning in community public health interventions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183469
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.441
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.559
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSarkar, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorGallacher, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-27T08:38:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-27T08:38:15Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationHealth And Place, 2013, v. 19 n. 1, p. 33-44en_US
dc.identifier.issn1353-8292en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183469-
dc.description.abstractThere exist no long term longitudinal studies assessing BMI trends of older adults in relation to the built environment. We employed cohort data from the Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS) to analyze the long term independent associations between a broad set of built environmental factors and change in BMI measured at three time points over a 12-year period. Built environment morphological metrics (morphometrics) used include measures of land use accessibility and space syntax modelled street network accessibility. A multilevel modelling framework was adopted wherein measurement occasions were nested within individuals and individuals were nested within LSOA census areas. BMI was observed to be significantly (p<0.05) associated with a number of built environment factors including mix; density of retail, churches, recreational and leisure services; street network accessibility as well as slope variability. Controlling for socio-demographic and lifestyle factors and for vascular diseases had negligible impact upon the influence of built environmental factors highlighting the importance of urban design and planning in community public health interventions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/healthplaceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHealth and Placeen_US
dc.subjectAccessibilityen_US
dc.subjectBmien_US
dc.subjectBuilt Environmenten_US
dc.subjectMultilevelen_US
dc.subjectSpace Syntaxen_US
dc.titleBuilt environment configuration and change in body mass index: The Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWebster, C: cwebster@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, C=rp01747en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.healthplace.2012.10.001en_US
dc.identifier.pmid23178327-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84869426695en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84869426695&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage33en_US
dc.identifier.epage44en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000312951400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSarkar, C=55489547800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGallacher, J=7005198349en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, C=7201838784en_US

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