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Article: The decentralising metropolis: Economic diversity and commuting in the US suburbs

TitleThe decentralising metropolis: Economic diversity and commuting in the US suburbs
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/
Citation
Urban Studies, 2006, v. 43 n. 13, p. 2525-2549 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper investigates historical changes in economic structure and the spatial distribution of jobs and commuting patterns during a period of consolidating suburban decentralisation in US cities. The analysis of selected US metropolitan areas is based on data drawn from the 1980 and 1990 PUMS (public use microdata samples). First, the paper compares changes in employment composition between regions and between two geographical sub-divisions in each of the metropolitan areas: the suburb and the central city. A diversity index is then measured for suburbs and central cities and an intertemporal comparison is made. Finally, changes in travel characteristics are discussed and analysed by industrial sector and geographical sub-division. The analysis shows a strong growth of suburban cities compared with central cities in each region, increased urbanisation economies in suburban cities and the dominance of suburb-to-suburb commuting. The historical pattern gives urban analysts and planners in Europe and elsewhere much to think about: in particular, the self-reinforcing nature of suburban agglomeration economies, the influence of growing suburban employment centres on commute patterns, the growth of centre-to-suburb commutes and the dominance of suburb-to-suburb commutes; and the ability of cities to reshape themselves as individual firms and households adopt strategies that lower the costs of transacting labour, services and all manner of commodities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183450
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.934
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.567
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorGook Seo, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-27T08:38:09Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-27T08:38:09Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationUrban Studies, 2006, v. 43 n. 13, p. 2525-2549en_US
dc.identifier.issn0042-0980en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183450-
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates historical changes in economic structure and the spatial distribution of jobs and commuting patterns during a period of consolidating suburban decentralisation in US cities. The analysis of selected US metropolitan areas is based on data drawn from the 1980 and 1990 PUMS (public use microdata samples). First, the paper compares changes in employment composition between regions and between two geographical sub-divisions in each of the metropolitan areas: the suburb and the central city. A diversity index is then measured for suburbs and central cities and an intertemporal comparison is made. Finally, changes in travel characteristics are discussed and analysed by industrial sector and geographical sub-division. The analysis shows a strong growth of suburban cities compared with central cities in each region, increased urbanisation economies in suburban cities and the dominance of suburb-to-suburb commuting. The historical pattern gives urban analysts and planners in Europe and elsewhere much to think about: in particular, the self-reinforcing nature of suburban agglomeration economies, the influence of growing suburban employment centres on commute patterns, the growth of centre-to-suburb commutes and the dominance of suburb-to-suburb commutes; and the ability of cities to reshape themselves as individual firms and households adopt strategies that lower the costs of transacting labour, services and all manner of commodities.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Studiesen_US
dc.titleThe decentralising metropolis: Economic diversity and commuting in the US suburbsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWebster, C: cwebster@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, C=rp01747en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00420980601038370en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845273301en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845273301&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume43en_US
dc.identifier.issue13en_US
dc.identifier.spage2525en_US
dc.identifier.epage2549en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000242518900009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, S=15048158000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGook Seo, J=15131783700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, C=7201838784en_US

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