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Article: Property rights and the public realm: Gates, green belts, and Gemeinschaft

TitleProperty rights and the public realm: Gates, green belts, and Gemeinschaft
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.envplan.com/B.html
Citation
Environment And Planning B: Planning And Design, 2002, v. 29 n. 3, p. 397-412 How to Cite?
AbstractDiscussions about gated communities, shopping malls, and industrial parks-proprietary developments produced by entrepreneurs-frequently espouse overly simplistic notions of private and public realms, viewing the encroachment of the latter by the former as a threat. In this essay I develop the thesis that, in reality, cities naturally fragment into many small publics, each of which may be thought of as a collective consumption club. The club realm may, therefore, be a more useful-and theoretically more powerful-idea than the public realm. I argue that proprietary communities are a particular case of urban consumption club-one in which legal property rights over neighbourhood public goods are assigned by property-market institutions. In other respects, the club realms that they create are not dissimilar from club realms created by other urban governance institutions. Government, the markets, and voluntary community action can all effectively assign property rights over shared neighbourhood goods, and in so doing create a set of included 'members' and a set of excluded 'nonmembers'. In contextualising the discussions of gated communities in this way, I draw connections between three interrelated concepts: public goods, the public domain, and the public realm.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183440
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.195
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.582
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-27T08:38:07Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-27T08:38:07Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironment And Planning B: Planning And Design, 2002, v. 29 n. 3, p. 397-412en_US
dc.identifier.issn0265-8135en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183440-
dc.description.abstractDiscussions about gated communities, shopping malls, and industrial parks-proprietary developments produced by entrepreneurs-frequently espouse overly simplistic notions of private and public realms, viewing the encroachment of the latter by the former as a threat. In this essay I develop the thesis that, in reality, cities naturally fragment into many small publics, each of which may be thought of as a collective consumption club. The club realm may, therefore, be a more useful-and theoretically more powerful-idea than the public realm. I argue that proprietary communities are a particular case of urban consumption club-one in which legal property rights over neighbourhood public goods are assigned by property-market institutions. In other respects, the club realms that they create are not dissimilar from club realms created by other urban governance institutions. Government, the markets, and voluntary community action can all effectively assign property rights over shared neighbourhood goods, and in so doing create a set of included 'members' and a set of excluded 'nonmembers'. In contextualising the discussions of gated communities in this way, I draw connections between three interrelated concepts: public goods, the public domain, and the public realm.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.envplan.com/B.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironment and Planning B: Planning and Designen_US
dc.titleProperty rights and the public realm: Gates, green belts, and Gemeinschaften_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWebster, C: cwebster@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, C=rp01747en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1068/b2755ren_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036094661en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036094661&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage397en_US
dc.identifier.epage412en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000175824600006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, C=7201838784en_US

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