File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: GIS and the scientific inputs to planning. Part 2: prediction and prescription

TitleGIS and the scientific inputs to planning. Part 2: prediction and prescription
Authors
Issue Date1994
Citation
Environment & Planning B: Planning & Design, 1994, v. 21 n. 2, p. 145-157 How to Cite?
AbstractThe author looks at how GIS can support analytical activities in urban planning, and the potential contribution of the technology in predictive and prescriptive analysis is discussed. These activities are defined in terms of their substantive content, and the potential contributions of GIS are explored under the headings of visualisation, data organisation and management and spatial analysis. It is argued that GIS has limited use in predictive analysis but is potentially well adapted to handling prescriptive problems. In a concluding section the author picks up points made in both papers, identifying general principles for GIS-based planning analysis and suggesting that GIS technology offers opportunities to improve the quality of planning decisions through its support of both formal and informal analysis. -Author
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183424
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWebster, CJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-27T08:38:03Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-27T08:38:03Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironment & Planning B: Planning & Design, 1994, v. 21 n. 2, p. 145-157en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183424-
dc.description.abstractThe author looks at how GIS can support analytical activities in urban planning, and the potential contribution of the technology in predictive and prescriptive analysis is discussed. These activities are defined in terms of their substantive content, and the potential contributions of GIS are explored under the headings of visualisation, data organisation and management and spatial analysis. It is argued that GIS has limited use in predictive analysis but is potentially well adapted to handling prescriptive problems. In a concluding section the author picks up points made in both papers, identifying general principles for GIS-based planning analysis and suggesting that GIS technology offers opportunities to improve the quality of planning decisions through its support of both formal and informal analysis. -Authoren_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironment & Planning B: Planning & Designen_US
dc.titleGIS and the scientific inputs to planning. Part 2: prediction and prescriptionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWebster, CJ: cwebster@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, CJ=rp01747en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1068/b210145-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028152728en_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage145en_US
dc.identifier.epage157en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994NJ02500004-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, CJ=7201838784en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats