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Article: The root CV-template as a property of the affix: Evidence from Yawelmani

TitleThe root CV-template as a property of the affix: Evidence from Yawelmani
Authors
Issue Date1983
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0167-806X
Citation
Natural Language And Linguistic Theory, 1983, v. 1 n. 3, p. 347-384 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this article, I have provided support for a skeletal core independent of any phonemic material. This is not a new theoretical claim, but rather adds to a small but growing literature (McCarthy 1979, 1981, Halle and Vergnaud 1980, Harris 1980, Marantz 1982, Yip 1982). However, the analysis here is an important addition because the skeleta are added to the grammer in an unfamiliar manner: affixes may determine the skeletal template of a root; if not, a default template is supplied, determined by a lexical diacritic on each verb root. Interestingly, recent work on Norwegian tone by Withgott and Halvorsen (in prep) suggests that when a suffix bears tone in Norwegian, the suffixal tone pattern surfaces on the word. With no affixes or with a toneless suffix, the underlying (or default) tone of the word surfaces. This parallels in tone the example in templates that Yokuts provides. In section 3, a CV-template pool consisting of the three default templates of verbs in Yawelmani was established. Certain affixes supply templates from this pool, and the phonemic melody of the root associates with the selected template according to universal conventions and the rule of V Spread (43). The assumption of a pool containing only three templates accounts for the pairing of bi- and triconsonantal forms when a template is selected by an affix, that is the CVC-CVCC, CVVC-CVVCC, and CVCVV-CVCVVC pairings. The triconsonantal template is selected in all cases. With biconsonantal roots, the third C-slot of the template has no segment associated with it, and so cannot surface. This explanation is elegant and concise, but is not available without the existence of an independent skeletal tier. © 1983 D. Reidel Publishing Company.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183408
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.845
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.341
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorArchangeli, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-27T07:12:53Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-27T07:12:53Z-
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.identifier.citationNatural Language And Linguistic Theory, 1983, v. 1 n. 3, p. 347-384en_US
dc.identifier.issn0167-806Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183408-
dc.description.abstractIn this article, I have provided support for a skeletal core independent of any phonemic material. This is not a new theoretical claim, but rather adds to a small but growing literature (McCarthy 1979, 1981, Halle and Vergnaud 1980, Harris 1980, Marantz 1982, Yip 1982). However, the analysis here is an important addition because the skeleta are added to the grammer in an unfamiliar manner: affixes may determine the skeletal template of a root; if not, a default template is supplied, determined by a lexical diacritic on each verb root. Interestingly, recent work on Norwegian tone by Withgott and Halvorsen (in prep) suggests that when a suffix bears tone in Norwegian, the suffixal tone pattern surfaces on the word. With no affixes or with a toneless suffix, the underlying (or default) tone of the word surfaces. This parallels in tone the example in templates that Yokuts provides. In section 3, a CV-template pool consisting of the three default templates of verbs in Yawelmani was established. Certain affixes supply templates from this pool, and the phonemic melody of the root associates with the selected template according to universal conventions and the rule of V Spread (43). The assumption of a pool containing only three templates accounts for the pairing of bi- and triconsonantal forms when a template is selected by an affix, that is the CVC-CVCC, CVVC-CVVCC, and CVCVV-CVCVVC pairings. The triconsonantal template is selected in all cases. With biconsonantal roots, the third C-slot of the template has no segment associated with it, and so cannot surface. This explanation is elegant and concise, but is not available without the existence of an independent skeletal tier. © 1983 D. Reidel Publishing Company.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0167-806Xen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNatural Language and Linguistic Theoryen_US
dc.titleThe root CV-template as a property of the affix: Evidence from Yawelmanien_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailArchangeli, D: darchang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityArchangeli, D=rp01748en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF00142470en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34248933224en_US
dc.identifier.volume1en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage347en_US
dc.identifier.epage384en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1983RU54400002-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridArchangeli, D=16426886100en_US

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