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Article: Introducing optimality theory

TitleIntroducing optimality theory
Authors
KeywordsConstraints
Linguistics
Phonology
Tibetan
Tonkawa
Universal Grammar
Issue Date1999
PublisherAnnual Reviews. The Journal's web site is located at http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/loi/anthro
Citation
Annual Review Of Anthropology, 1999, v. 28, p. 531-552 How to Cite?
AbstractOptimality theory was introduced in the early 1990s as an alternative model of the organization of natural human language sound systems. This article provides an introduction to the model for the nonlinguist. The basic principles of optimality theory are introduced and explained (GEN, CON, and EVAL). Three important constraint families are explored (Faithfulness, Alignment, and Markedness). Illustrations are provided involving syllabification and vowel harmony in Tibetan and prosodic phonotactics in Tonkawa. The article closes with two general discussions. The first addresses recurring issues in phonological and linguistic analysis and sketches how optimality theory might account for these. The second points out how the explanations arrived at through optimality theory are providing new answers to familiar questions, as well as raising new questions for study.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183406
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.2
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.640
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorArchangeli, DBen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-27T07:12:53Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-27T07:12:53Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnnual Review Of Anthropology, 1999, v. 28, p. 531-552en_US
dc.identifier.issn0084-6570en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183406-
dc.description.abstractOptimality theory was introduced in the early 1990s as an alternative model of the organization of natural human language sound systems. This article provides an introduction to the model for the nonlinguist. The basic principles of optimality theory are introduced and explained (GEN, CON, and EVAL). Three important constraint families are explored (Faithfulness, Alignment, and Markedness). Illustrations are provided involving syllabification and vowel harmony in Tibetan and prosodic phonotactics in Tonkawa. The article closes with two general discussions. The first addresses recurring issues in phonological and linguistic analysis and sketches how optimality theory might account for these. The second points out how the explanations arrived at through optimality theory are providing new answers to familiar questions, as well as raising new questions for study.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAnnual Reviews. The Journal's web site is located at http://arjournals.annualreviews.org/loi/anthroen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Review of Anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectConstraintsen_US
dc.subjectLinguisticsen_US
dc.subjectPhonologyen_US
dc.subjectTibetanen_US
dc.subjectTonkawaen_US
dc.subjectUniversal Grammaren_US
dc.titleIntroducing optimality theoryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailArchangeli, DB: darchang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityArchangeli, DB=rp01748en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1542740559en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1542740559&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.spage531en_US
dc.identifier.epage552en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridArchangeli, DB=16426886100en_US

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