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postgraduate thesis: A study on the variant Cantonese in Hong Kong

TitleA study on the variant Cantonese in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Cheung, K. [張啟彥]. (2011). A study on the variant Cantonese in Hong Kong = Xianggang bian ti Guangzhou hua yan jiu. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4786946
AbstractCantonese (Gu?ngd?ng Hu?), a dialect of Chinese, has origins in the city of Canton (now usually Guangzhou), the capital of Guangdong Province and its surrounding localities in Southern China. Since the province was also known as Yue, Cantonese was also given the name Yue Yu in Chinese. These names, however, are somewhat ambiguous, for such other dialects as Hakka, Teochew also prevail in Guangdong Province. Therefore, Cantonese speakers often call their dialect Gu?ngzh?u Hu?, literally the dialect spoken in Guangzhou. The people of Hong Kong mainly speak Cantonese. Insomuch as Hong Kong was a colony of Britain until 1997 after China’s defeat in the First Opium War (1839-1841), many a great Western, British in particular, institutions and thoughts were introduced to Hong Kong. The city has had a different way of life as well as socio-economic systems from those in Mainland China. The divergence was sharpened after the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, for the colony was politically disconnected from the mainland. Variations in vocabulary and pronunciation are therefore found in the Cantonese in Hong Kong. A new ‘language’ termed Computer-mediated Communication Language (CMC) has even newly emerged in recent years on the Internet as a result of economic progress and technological innovation in late twentieth century Hong Kong. This research is aimed at dealing with the Cantonese variety in Hong Kong. This thesis begins with a fresh attempt to redefine Cantonese. In the second chapter, the rise of the Cantonese variety in Hong Kong will be analysed from sundry perspectives, including politics, economics, history, culture, lifestyle, and the development of information technology. Different Cantonese variants will, too, be categorised and explained. The following three issues will be analysed in detail in three separate chapters: 1) puns used in advertisements or news headline; 2) CMC; 3) variants of Cantonese in Hong Kong newspapers and magazines. Attention will also be paid to code-switching and loanword adaptation from English and Japanese etc. The last chapter is a conclusion, which restates that the Cantonese variety in Hong Kong has developed via the process of self-creation, internal selection as well as adaption of foreign words and phrases. Also, it briefly summarises the relationship between the Hong Kong Cantonese variety and the social context in which they are used. It ends with a short discussion about the standardisation of dialects.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectCantonese dialects - China - Hong Kong.
Chinese language - Dialects - China - Hong Kong.
Dept/ProgramChinese

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Kai-yin-
dc.contributor.author張啟彥-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationCheung, K. [張啟彥]. (2011). A study on the variant Cantonese in Hong Kong = Xianggang bian ti Guangzhou hua yan jiu. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4786946-
dc.description.abstractCantonese (Gu?ngd?ng Hu?), a dialect of Chinese, has origins in the city of Canton (now usually Guangzhou), the capital of Guangdong Province and its surrounding localities in Southern China. Since the province was also known as Yue, Cantonese was also given the name Yue Yu in Chinese. These names, however, are somewhat ambiguous, for such other dialects as Hakka, Teochew also prevail in Guangdong Province. Therefore, Cantonese speakers often call their dialect Gu?ngzh?u Hu?, literally the dialect spoken in Guangzhou. The people of Hong Kong mainly speak Cantonese. Insomuch as Hong Kong was a colony of Britain until 1997 after China’s defeat in the First Opium War (1839-1841), many a great Western, British in particular, institutions and thoughts were introduced to Hong Kong. The city has had a different way of life as well as socio-economic systems from those in Mainland China. The divergence was sharpened after the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, for the colony was politically disconnected from the mainland. Variations in vocabulary and pronunciation are therefore found in the Cantonese in Hong Kong. A new ‘language’ termed Computer-mediated Communication Language (CMC) has even newly emerged in recent years on the Internet as a result of economic progress and technological innovation in late twentieth century Hong Kong. This research is aimed at dealing with the Cantonese variety in Hong Kong. This thesis begins with a fresh attempt to redefine Cantonese. In the second chapter, the rise of the Cantonese variety in Hong Kong will be analysed from sundry perspectives, including politics, economics, history, culture, lifestyle, and the development of information technology. Different Cantonese variants will, too, be categorised and explained. The following three issues will be analysed in detail in three separate chapters: 1) puns used in advertisements or news headline; 2) CMC; 3) variants of Cantonese in Hong Kong newspapers and magazines. Attention will also be paid to code-switching and loanword adaptation from English and Japanese etc. The last chapter is a conclusion, which restates that the Cantonese variety in Hong Kong has developed via the process of self-creation, internal selection as well as adaption of foreign words and phrases. Also, it briefly summarises the relationship between the Hong Kong Cantonese variety and the social context in which they are used. It ends with a short discussion about the standardisation of dialects.-
dc.languagechi-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B4786946X-
dc.subject.lcshCantonese dialects - China - Hong Kong.-
dc.subject.lcshChinese language - Dialects - China - Hong Kong.-
dc.titleA study on the variant Cantonese in Hong Kong-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4786946-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineChinese-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4786946-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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